Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • As we arrive, Alex (Skulljuice) is already deep in tune "spinnage".

    The Line Of Best Fit

  • BECK: You know, they keep saying, Amy, that, you know, gosh, we have to have universal health care and how are we going to pay for Social Security, and we have to do ... here's an idea, cut the spinnage museums.

    CNN Transcript Jul 3, 2007

  • Today they marched us off to listen to a hour sermon by a antiquated ol 'bunch of spinnage, who at the end bawled out, No. 475.

    Love Letters of a Rookie to Julie

  • Today we are only battling with seconds, or fractions thereof, and therefore, any deviation from the straight course, or any wheel spinnage or anything of that sort which will lose a second or half a second is just the difference between success or failure.

    An Address by Sir Malcolm Campbell

  • “What a world of gammon and spinnage it is, though, ain’t it!

    XXII. Some Old Scenes, and Some New People

  • Tall, handsome figger, benevolent face, elegant smile that won't come off, as the feller says, Chauncey Depew spinnage in front of each ear.

    The Wit and Humor of America, Volume III. (of X.)

  • 'What a world of gammon and spinnage it is, though, ain't it!'

    David Copperfield

  • 'Toor rul lol loo, gammon and spinnage, the frog he wouldn't, and high cockolorum,' said the Dodger: with a slight sneer on his intellectual countenance.

    Oliver Twist

  • "Toor rul lol loo, gammon and spinnage, the frog he wouldn't, and high cockolorum," said the Dodger: with a slight sneer on his intellectual countenance.

    Oliver Twist

  • Vinyl is enjoying a major retro revival, of course, and punters are invited to bring their ow n LPs without a penny's spinnage charged.

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

Comments

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  • I wonder how many rumplestiltsusers Wordnik has.

    January 15, 2016

  • I'm thinking that maybe it's really rhyming slang. The husband could say he's going out for pudding, ham and spinach, but the double meanings could mean he's going out to the casino for roulette and backgammon.

    January 13, 2016

  • Woke up to an email from Wordnik, reminding me I had an account.

    Remembered old password. Poked about.

    Now wondering what the "Visuals' below have to do with this word.

    Maybe they're clues?

    January 13, 2016

  • Found this bit..


    https://books.google.ca/books?id=y_heAAAAcAAJ
    "The Ill Effects of the Game of Rowlet, Otherwise Rowley-powley: And the Fatal Consequences Attending It; Particularly in and about Covent-Garden. Addressed to All Degrees of Men; with a Word of Advice to the Fair-sex"

    It seems that Rowley Powley is a game that will torment a person's soul, take their money, and ruin their families; cause barrenness;


    Or there's roly-poly the game or the pudding

    Here's the old rhyme

    January 12, 2016

  • "I remember seeing mentioned somewhere, without any reference to this chorus, that _rowley powley_ is a name for a plump fowl, of which both 'gammon and spinach' are posthumous connexions."
    - Notes and Queries, Number 35, June 29, 1850 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc

    January 12, 2016

  • I'll give you spinnage if you'll let me sneak off with the rowley and powley.

    January 12, 2016

  • "with a rowley, powley, gammon, and spinnage"

    early form of spinach?

    January 12, 2016