Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Having the power to persuade or convince; persuasive.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having power to persuade; persuasive.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Having power to persuade; persuasive; suasory.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having power to persuade; persuasive.

Etymologies

Latin suāsus, past participle of suādēre, to advise; see suasion + -ive.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • This means that no suasive grounds in reason exist that would also make it plausible.

    Atheism

  • The virtue of AOA as opposed to OA is that AOA is sufficiently suasive to ensure economic commitment and participation.

    Almost Open Access

  • About the best one can say for it is that it depends on substantial and moot principles of Aristotelian metaphysics, and, in any case, as a suasive argument, begs the question.

    Dialetheism

  • The formal availability of civil liberties and the existence of suasive entities like a representative assembly, competing political parties, mass organizations, mass media and the like tend to obscure the class character of the state.

    Naxalite Maoist India

  • In coordination with or after failure of suasive means to deceive and calm down the aggrieved toiling masses, the exploiting classes can escalate the show and use of brute force from the level of private army and civilian armed gangs through the local police to any of the major services of the Armed Forces of the

    Naxalite Maoist India

  • In regard to speech a man may study all that which may make him suasive, but if he go beyond that he will trench on those histrionic efforts, which he will know to be wrong because he will be ashamed to acknowledge them.

    The Duke's Children

  • “My dear,” said Aunt Margaret, the next morning, speaking in her most suasive tone, “your Cousin Tom is to be allowed to call here.”

    Ayala's Angel

  • Heard suasive pleas, and Zeus through them resolved.

    The Suppliants

  • She opened her mouth to tell him so, and then a queer but utterly per-suasive sensation enfolded her: they were being watched.

    Wizard and Glass

  • "My dear," said Aunt Margaret, the next morning, speaking in her most suasive tone, "your Cousin Tom is to be allowed to call here."

    Ayala's Angel

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