Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun An apparatus that projects a series of images onto a screen at rapid speed to test visual perception, memory, and learning.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In experimental psychology, an apparatus which exposes to view, for a brief and accurately variable time, an object or small group of objects (letters, short words, etc.).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Physiol.) An apparatus for exposing briefly to view a screen bearing letters or figures. It is used in studying the range of attention, or the power of distinguishing separate objects in a single impression.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun a device that displays a series of brief images; used by psychologists to investigate perception, memory and learning

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun scientific instrument used by psychologists; presents visual stimuli for brief exposures

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Greek takhistos, superlative of takhus, swift + –scope.]

Examples

  • A device called a tachistoscope was used during WWII to help fighter pilots identify aircraft silhouettes.

    Speed Reading: Fact or Fiction? « Articles « Literacy News

  • Scientists developed an instrument called the tachistoscope to study the effects of flicker.

    Find Your Focus Zone

  • Scientists developed an instrument called the tachistoscope to study the effects of flicker.

    Find Your Focus Zone

  • Scientists developed an instrument called the tachistoscope to study the effects of flicker.

    Find Your Focus Zone

  • Scientists developed an instrument called the tachistoscope to study the effects of flicker.

    Find Your Focus Zone

  • The simple java application is based on the tachistoscope, a rapid image recognition device.

    A Book is Just a Very Long Text Message, Arnold Kling | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • In laboratory tests, split brains look at objects through a tachistoscope that presents information to only one hemisphere or look at image that is flashed briefly to one side of the visual field.

    Archive 2006-10-01

  • In laboratory tests, split brains look at objects through a tachistoscope that presents information to only one hemisphere or look at image that is flashed briefly to one side of the visual field.

    Split Brain

  • Researcher James Vicary has installed a tachistoscope, a machine that can inject subliminal images of tiny fractions of a second-far below that of a person's conscious threshold.

    jeffmilner.com

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