tatterdemalion love

tatterdemalion

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A person wearing ragged or tattered clothing; a ragamuffin.
  • adjective Ragged; tattered.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A ragged fellow.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A ragged fellow; a ragamuffin.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Tattered.
  • noun A person with tattered clothing; a pauper.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a dirty shabbily clothed urchin
  • adjective worn to shreds; or wearing torn or ragged clothing
  • adjective in deplorable condition

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Probably tattered + -demalion, of unknown meaning.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

The first part of the word is tatter; the origin of the second part is unclear. First attested circa 1608.

Examples

  • Within half a dozen years of the first appearance of "tatterdemalion," it came to be used as an adjective to describe anything or anyone ragged or disreputable.

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

  • We do know that "tatterdemalion" has been used in print since the 1600s.

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

  • Within half a dozen years of the first appearance of "tatterdemalion," it came to be used as an adjective to describe anything or anyone ragged or disreputable.

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

  • I envisioned traps, snares, pits, poisons, even the construction of some kind of tatterdemalion designed to terrify beavers.

    LJWorld.com stories: News

  • The exact origin of "tatterdemalion" is uncertain, but it's probably connected to either the noun "tatter" ( "a torn scrap or shred") or the adjective "tattered"

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

  • We do know that "tatterdemalion" has been used in print since the 1600s.

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

  • Within half a dozen years of the first appearance of "tatterdemalion," it came to be used as an adjective to describe anything or anyone ragged or disreputable.

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

  • We do know that "tatterdemalion" has been used in print since the 1600s.

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

  • The exact origin of "tatterdemalion" is uncertain, but it's probably connected to either the noun "tatter" ( "a torn scrap or shred") or the adjective "tattered"

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

  • I envisioned traps, snares, pits, poisons, even the construction of some kind of tatterdemalion designed to terrify beavers.

    LJWorld.com stories: News

Comments

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  • "Florry Talbot, a blond feeble goosefat whore in a tatterdemalion gown of mildewed strawberry ..." Joyce, Ulysses, 15

    January 1, 2008

  • Uff, don't hold back, James.

    September 17, 2008