Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A communications system that transmits and receives simple unmodulated electric impulses, especially one in which the transmission and reception stations are directly connected by wires.
  • n. A message transmitted by telegraph; a telegram.
  • transitive v. To transmit (a message) by telegraph.
  • transitive v. To send or convey a message to (a recipient) by telegraph.
  • transitive v. To make known (a feeling or an attitude, for example) by nonverbal means: telegraphed her derision with a smirk.
  • transitive v. To make known (an intended action, for example) in advance or unintentionally: By massing troops on the border, the enemy telegraphed its intended invasion to the target country.
  • intransitive v. To send or transmit a telegram.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An apparatus, or a process, for communicating rapidly between distant points, especially by means of established visible or audible signals representing words or ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by electrical means.
  • v. To send a message by telegraph
  • v. To give nonverbal signals to another, as with gestures or a change in attitude.
  • v. To show one's intended action unintentionally.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An apparatus, or a process, for communicating intelligence rapidly between distant points, especially by means of preconcerted visible or audible signals representing words or ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by electrical action.
  • transitive v. To convey or announce by telegraph.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In cricket, the score-board upon which numbers indicating the progress of the game are displayed.
  • n. In ship-building, an apparatus for transmitting and receiving orders mechanically.
  • n. A chute or trough, usually of sheet-steel, by which coal or ore or refuse is carried by gravity from screens or other dressing machinery to the desired point of disposal.
  • n. An apparatus for transmitting intelligible messages to a distance.
  • n.
  • n. An electric telegraph of the needle or pointer class.
  • n. A system of transmission for signals in which a bell is sounded and a pointer caused to indicate a message by the compression of air in a reservoir at one end of a long tube, the compression being transmitted to the opposite end of the tube. This system is used in hotels, manufactories, etc., and to transmit steering and steaming directions on shipboard.
  • To transmit or convey, as a communication, speech, intelligence, or order, by a semaphore or telegraph, especially by the electric telegraph.
  • To send a message by telegraph.
  • To signal; communicate by signs.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. send cables, wires, or telegrams
  • n. apparatus used to communicate at a distance over a wire (usually in Morse code)

Etymologies

From French télégraphe. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • prior to electroniic communications, telegraphs were visual and indicated with flags and signs.
    http://books.google.ca/books?id=hGcpAAAAYAAJ United States Telegraph Vocabulary - lists the flags which convert to numeric codes, which are then looked up in the book.

    October 24, 2013

  • "What hath God wrought?": The first electronic message, telegraphed by Samuel F.B. Morse in May 1844 from Washington to Baltimore.

    October 24, 2007