Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A tremulous effect produced by rapid repetition of a single tone or by rapid alternation of two tones.
  • noun A device on an organ for producing a tremulous effect.
  • noun Vibrato, especially in singing.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In music:
  • noun A tremulous or fluttering effect in vocal music, intended to give a sentimental or passionate quality to the tone, but often carried to a pedantic and offensive extreme.
  • noun A similar effect in instrumental music, produced by a rapid reiteration of a tone or chord.
  • noun A similar effect in organ music, produced in the pipe-organ by means of a delicately balanced bellows attached to one of the wind-trunks, and in the reed-organ by a revolving fan.
  • noun The mechanical device in an organ by which a tremolo is produced; a tremulant. The use of such a mechanism is usually controlled by a stop-knob. Also tremolant, tremulant.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The rapid reiteration of tones without any apparent cessation, so as to produce a tremulous effect.
  • noun A certain contrivance in an organ, which causes the notes to sound with rapid pulses or beats, producing a tremulous effect; -- called also tremolant, and tremulant.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun music A rapid repetition of the same note, or an alternation between two or more notes. It can also be intended to mean a rapid and repetitive variation in pitch for the duration of a note. It is notated by a strong diagonal bar across the note stem, or a detached bar for a set of notes (or stemless notes).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun (music) a tremulous effect produced by rapid repetition of a single tone or rapid alternation of two tones
  • noun vocal vibrato especially an excessive or poorly controlled one

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Italian, from Latin tremulus, tremulous; see tremulous.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Borrowed from Italian tremolo, first-person present indicative of tremolare ("to shake"). Origin: 1715-25.

Examples

Comments

New comments are temporarily disabled while we update our database.

  • *shakes the page*

    September 27, 2008

  • *listens*

    September 27, 2008

  • bilby, you'll make my PC fall!

    (edited)

    September 29, 2008