Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A three-legged object, such as a cauldron, stool, or table.
  • noun An adjustable three-legged stand, as for supporting a transit or camera.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In the sponge-spicules, a threerayed element having the arms of equal length and sloping from the point of union.
  • Having three feet or legs.
  • noun In classical antiquity, a seat, table, or other article resting on three feet.
  • noun Hence, any object having three feet or legs, as a three-legged stool.
  • noun A three-legged frame or stand, usually jointed at the top, for supporting a theodolite, compass, camera, or other instrument. See cuts under rock-drill and transit.
  • noun In anatomy and zoology, a tripodal formation; a three-pronged or triradiate structure, as a bone. The premaxillary bone of birds is a tripod.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Any utensil or vessel, as a stool, table, altar, caldron, etc., supported on three feet.
  • noun A three-legged frame or stand, usually jointed at top, for supporting a theodolite, compass, telescope, camera, or other instrument.
  • noun (Physiol.) the three organs, the heart, lungs, and brain; -- so called because their united action is necessary to the maintenance of life.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun a three-legged stand or mount
  • noun slang A man that has a large penis disproportionate to his short stature, especially a of a dwarf
  • verb intransitive To enter the tripod position showing signs of exhaustion or distress.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a three-legged rack used for support

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin tripūs, tripod-, from Greek tripous, three-footed : tri-, tri- + pous, foot; see –pod.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From tripod- and τριποδ- (tripod-), the stems of the Latin tripūs and its etymon the Ancient Greek τρίπους (tripous); compare tripus.

Examples

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