Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A swollen, fleshy, usually underground stem of a plant, such as the potato, bearing buds from which new plant shoots arise.
  • n. A rounded projection or swelling; a tubercle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A fleshy, thickened underground stem of a plant, usually containing stored starch, as for example a potato or arrowroot.
  • n. A thickened "root-stock".

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.
  • n. A fleshy, rounded stem or root, usually containing starchy matter, as the potato or arrowroot; a thickened root-stock. See Illust. of tuberous.
  • n. A genus of fungi. See truffle.
  • n. A tuberosity; a tubercle.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In botany, a subterranean body, usually of an oblong or rounded form, consisting morphologically of a stolon-like branch of a rhizome, much thickened, commonly at the end, and beset with “eyes,” which are properly modified axillary buds.
  • n. A genus of subterranean discomycetous fungi, the truffles, having the peridium warty or tubercled, without definite base, the asci ovoid or globose, and one- to three- or (rarely) four-spored. About 50 species are known. T. æstivum is the common truffle. See truffle (with cut).
  • n. In pathol., anat., and zoology, some rounded swelling part; a tuberosity; a tubercle; a knot or swelling which is not the result of disease: used chiefly as a Latin word (with Latin plural tubera).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a fleshy underground stem or root serving for reproductive and food storage
  • n. type genus of the Tuberaceae: fungi whose fruiting bodies are typically truffles

Etymologies

Latin tūber, lump.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin tūber ("bump, hump, swelling"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Now, I can't really comment on his career and if he really was like the potato, but what he said about the tuber, is something I can concur with.

    Just potatoes

  • And thus began the investigation of how this tasty tuber is used here and its place in the country's culinary history.

    Mexican Sweet Potatoes, from Soup to Dessert: Los Camotes

  • Round or elongated, firm-fleshed and quite gourmet, this tuber is becoming a hit on the culinary scene at fine restaurants ...

    Papas Rojas. Papas Marruecas, et al

  • Potatoes are propagated by what are called sets, that is, pieces into which the tuber is cut, each of which contains a bud or eye.

    The Lady's Country Companion: or, How to Enjoy a Country Life Rationally

  • It therefore becomes necessary to develop specific storage methods for each root and tuber, which is illustrated by the great variety of traditional storage systems.

    3 Basic comments on the storage properties of roots and tubers

  • The central tuber, which is the biggest and yet soft, is the one chiefly used for food.

    Chapter 7

  • The tuber is the _Topinambour_, and _Pois de terre_ of the French; having been brought to Europe in 1617.

    Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure

  • [6] A tuber is a swollen, fleshy bud that will grow on the part of the stem that is buried in the soil, they create shoots where a new plant with someday grow.

    CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]

  • It is under threat from urbanisation - the construction of roads and shopping malls - and from over-exploitation - in places where the plant still occurs in Namibia, South African and Botswana, harvesting is uncontrolled and often involves uprooting of its tuber, which is rich in starch.

    AllAfrica News: Latest

  • Schmidt said, "A tuber is a tumor, they call it a tuber because of the way that it grows, it kind of more like potatoish."

    WISH TV

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