Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Not having been pardoned; unforgiven.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- +‎ pardoned

Examples

  • Sin unpardoned, and nothing else, can keep any under his power.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume VI (Acts to Revelation)

  • If you haven't heard, Governor Palin was criticized recently for conducting an interview during just such a pardoning ceremony while in the background an employee of the turkey farm is enthusiastically stuffing a presumably unpardoned turkey into what appears to be a grinder.

    Stop Pardoning Turkeys

  • According to federal legislation Dr. Henry Morgentaler did not qualify as Order of Canada recipient due to his prior unpardoned criminal conviction and past findings of medical malpractice.

    Ahenakew to be Retried for Hate : Law is Cool

  • In Italy, it sometimes seems that no bad deed goes unpardoned.

    Archive 2008-04-01

  • However, can a pardoned person really be unpardoned by the president?

    Missing Words Suggest Path to a Pardon - The Caucus Blog - NYTimes.com

  • In a resignation letter to the president, Mr. terHorst explained that he could not "credibly defend" the pardon when others — from conscientious objectors to the draft, to Watergate co-conspirators — went unpardoned.

    Ford Press Secretary Made News Himself

  • In a resignation letter to the president, Mr. terHorst explained that he could not "credibly defend" the pardon when others — from conscientious objectors to the draft, to Watergate co-conspirators — went unpardoned.

    Ford Press Secretary Made News Himself

  • He wrote one of the more famous resignation letters to come out of the White House, writing on September 8, 1974 that he could not "credibly defend" the pardon of Richard Nixon when others -- from conscientious objectors to the Vietnam War to other Watergate figures -- went unpardoned.

    Joe Rodota: The Year in Resignations

  • In a resignation letter to the president, Mr. terHorst explained that he could not "credibly defend" the pardon when others — from conscientious objectors to the draft, to Watergate co-conspirators — went unpardoned.

    Ford Press Secretary Made News Himself

  • He wrote one of the more famous resignation letters to come out of the White House, writing on September 8, 1974 that he could not "credibly defend" the pardon of Richard Nixon when others -- from conscientious objectors to the Vietnam War to other Watergate figures -- went unpardoned.

    Joe Rodota: The Year in Resignations

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