Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of, relating to, or contained in the veins: venous circulation.
  • adj. Of, relating to, or being the blood in the veins or pulmonary arteries that is usually dark red as a result of low oxygen content.
  • adj. Having numerous veins, as a leaf or the wings of an insect.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to veins.
  • adj. Possessing veins.
  • adj. Having numerous veins.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to a vein or veins.
  • adj. Contained in the veins, or having the same qualities as if contained in the veins, that is, having a dark bluish color and containing an insufficient amount of oxygen so as no longer to be fit for oxygenating the tissues; -- said of the blood, and opposed to arterial.
  • adj. Marked with veins; veined.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining to veins; full of veins; contained in veins; veined; venose: as, the venous system; venous blood or circulation; a. venous plexus, sinus, or radicle.
  • In entomology, having veins or nervures; venose or veined, as an insect's wing.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of or contained in or performing the function of the veins

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

From Latin vēnōsus, from vēna, vein.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Variant of venose, from Latin venosus.

Examples

  • When the muscles of the calves and thighs are in contraction, blood low in oxygen, what we call venous blood, is pumped through the leg muscle pump from the legs to the heart.

    Eye of the Storm

  • Dr. Saltzman also reports 100% success with keeping pediatric patients out of the operating room to obtain venous access.

    Breakthrough VeinViewer Imaging System | Impact Lab

  • The lymphatic vessels pump up this fluid from every part of the system, and convey it into the veins to be mixed with the blood which runs through them, and which is commonly called venous blood.

    Conversations on Chemistry, V. 1-2 In Which the Elements of that Science Are Familiarly Explained and Illustrated by Experiments

  • The follow-up analysis of three recently completed international clinical studies on short-term venous thromboembolism (VTE) protective medicine in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery demonstrated that the ultra-low-molecular-weight heparin semuloparin reduced the incidence of VTE and all-cause death by 25 per cent compared to the commonly used therapy drug enoxaparin (a low-molecular-weight heparin).

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • But since the majority of CLABSI cases occur on other hospital floors that care for acutely ill, high-risk patients who require the long-term venous access for delivery of IV medications or nutrition, the Penn investigators sought to identify ways to eliminate all preventable infections of this kind.

    EurekAlert! - Breaking News

  • Eliquis already has received European regulatory approval as a treatment to prevent certain blood clots, known as venous thromboembolism, in people undergoing knee- and hip-replacement surgery.

    Stroke Drug to Get Speedy FDA Review

  • Xarelto is currently approved in the U.S. as a short-term treatment to prevent certain blood clots, known as venous thromboembolism, or VTE, in people undergoing knee- and hip-replacement surgery.

    Bayer, J&J Suffer FDA Setback

  • On Friday, J&J and Bayer said the FDA approved Xarelto to prevent certain blood clots, known as venous thromboembolism, or VTE, in people undergoing knee- and hip-replacement surgery.

    Anticlot Drug From J&J, Bayer Advances

  • Rosuvastatin (Crestor) reduced the risk of a potentially fatal blood-clot disorder called venous thromboembolism in a new study, The New York Times reports today.

    Considering switching to Crestor? Not so fast

  • Rosuvastatin Crestor reduced the risk of a potentially fatal blood-clot disorder called venous thromboembolism in a new study, The New York Times reports today.

    Considering switching to Crestor? Not so fast

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