Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A zigzag fence made by placing the ends of the rails at an angle upon one another; a snake-fence.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Forsaking the main road, they crossed Wild Water on a narrow bridge and continued along an ancient, rutted road that ran beside an equally ancient worm-fence of split redwood rails.

    CHAPTER XVII

  • After discussing for a few minutes the probabilities of such a course on the part of the enemy, I thought McCook should be made acquainted with what was going on, so Sill and I went back to see him at his headquarters, not far from the Griscom House, where we found him sleeping on some straw in the angle of a worm-fence.

    She Makes Her Mouth Small & Round & Other Stories

  • Time was, when safe in a saddle, he had thrown reins to the wind "en allowed that critter a spell of fancy worm-fence buckin ', but a-ridin' a auto wuz dangerous business."

    David Lannarck, Midget An Adventure Story

  • He had evidently just gotten over the "worm-fence" into the road, out of the path which led zigzag across the "old field" and was lost to sight in the dense growth of sassafras.

    Short Stories for English Courses

  • He wondered, as they walked along, if Potter and the boys at the stables had framed a rodeo spectacle for themselves and were to witness some worm-fence bucking by midget contestants.

    David Lannarck, Midget An Adventure Story

  • The same is the case with respect to leaping: there being in many places no gates, the snake or worm-fence

    George Washington: Farmer

  • The "citizen-soldier" knew no more about "dressing the line," than about dressing himself, and the front of his company presented as many inequalities as a "worm-fence."

    Western Characters or Types of Border Life in the Western States

  • The sight of the man brought George before him, living enough to wring his heart He knocked a log off the worm-fence, and stepped over into the field.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, No. 59, September, 1862

  • After discussing for a few minutes the probabilities of such a course on the part of the enemy, I thought McCook should be made acquainted with what was going on, so Sill and I went back to see him at his headquarters, not far from the Griscom House, where we found him sleeping on some straw in the angle of a worm-fence.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • But I was away, striding over the cabbage-patch and climbing the worm-fence that shut in the estate of Hiram.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 12, No. 31, October, 1873

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