Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun An association of farmers founded in the United States in 1867.
  • noun One of the branch lodges of this association.
  • noun Chiefly British A farm, especially the residence and outbuildings of a gentleman farmer.
  • noun Archaic A granary.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To farm, as revenue or taxes.
  • noun A granary.
  • noun A farming establishment, including the farm-buildings and granary, attached to a feudal manor or to a religious house, where, in addition to its own crops, the grain paid as rent and tithes was stored.
  • noun A farm, with its dwelling-house, stables, byres, barns, etc.; particularly, a house or farm at a distance from other houses or villages; the dwelling of a yeoman or gentleman farmer.
  • noun In the United States, a lodge of the order of “Patrons of Husbandry,” a secret association for the promotion of the interests of agriculture.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete A building for storing grain; a granary.
  • noun A farmhouse, with the barns and other buildings for farming purposes.
  • noun obsolete A farmhouse of a monastery, where the rents and tithes, paid in grain, were deposited.
  • noun A farm; generally, a farm with a house at a distance from neighbors.
  • noun United States An association of farmers, designed to further their interests, and particularly to bring producers and consumers, farmers and manufacturers, into direct commercial relations, without intervention of middlemen or traders. The first grange was organized in 1867.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun UK A farm, especially that of a gentleman farmer.
  • noun Outlying land belonging to a monastery.
  • noun archaic A granary.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an outlying farm

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, granary, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *grānica, from Latin grānum, seed; see gr̥ə-no- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French grange.

Examples

  • I am calling the grange women and telling them no more historical romance novels allowed in the books they bring here.

    Dragon Warrior

  • I am calling the grange women and telling them no more historical romance novels allowed in the books they bring here.

    Dragon Warrior

  • I am calling the grange women and telling them no more historical romance novels allowed in the books they bring here.

    Dragon Warrior

  • I am calling the grange women and telling them no more historical romance novels allowed in the books they bring here.

    Dragon Warrior

  • The Comte de Maucombe's servants donned their old laced liveries and hats, the coachman his great top-boots; we sat five in the antiquated carriage, and arrived in state about two o'clock -- the dinner was for three -- at the grange, which is the dwelling of the

    Letters of Two Brides

  • 1932 -- Liberty, New Florida Robert Lee found Luisa Hernandez waiting for him within the community hall, the place he and the others who'd built it with their bare hands had once called the grange hall.

    Asimov's Science Fiction

  • The Comte de Maucombe’s servants donned their old laced liveries and hats, the coachman his great top-boots; we sat five in the antiquated carriage, and arrived in state about two o’clock — the dinner was for three — at the grange, which is the dwelling of the Baron de l’Estorade.

    Letters of Two Brides

  • "Technically in Old English a grange was a large barn for grain storage.

    The Hard War

  • “Technically in Old English a grange was a large barn for grain storage.

    The Hard Way

  • "Primarily, the object of the grange has been the education of the farmers.

    A Spoil of Office A Story of the Modern West

Comments

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  • a farm (also Patrons of Husbandry, an organization of farmers)

    July 22, 2007