Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of several contagious skin diseases of mammals caused by parasitic mites and characterized by skin lesions, itching, and loss of hair.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To eat.
  • noun A skin-disease or cutaneous affection of brutes, as the dog, horse, cattle, etc., resembling the itch, and caused by the presence in the skin of various acarines, especially the mange-mite. The term is loosely extended to some similar affections, whether or not of parasitic origin.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Vet.) The scab or itch in cattle, dogs, and other beasts.
  • noun (Zoöl.) any one of several species of small parasitic mites, which burrow in the skin of cattle. horses, dogs, and other animals, causing the mange. The mange insect of the horse (Psoroptes equi or Dermatodectes equi), and that of cattle (Symbiotes bovis or Dermatophagys bovis) are the most important species. See Acarina.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun pathology A skin disease of mammals caused by parasitic mites.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a persistent and contagious disease of the skin causing inflammation and itching and loss of hair; affects domestic animals (and sometimes people)

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English manjeue, from Old French manjue, from mangier, to eat; see manger.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Middle English manjewe, manjeue, from Old French manjue, derived from mangier ("to eat") (modern French manger ("to eat")), from Latin manducare

Examples

  • I though that would be one of the worst as there so many other bugs that can irretate the mange& add more bug to the mange.

    Yahoo! Answers: Latest Questions

  • What Phillips appears to mange is to allow us to experience the unknown and yet let it remain unknown.

    oldcharliebrown's Journal

  • He's been having stuff done to him since the day we found him, covered in mange and infections, so he's very used to it and very trusting.

    buster news

  • We had Gypsy not quite two years when we found another little dog on the street, sweet and cheerful and completely housetrained, despite being covered in mange and infections.

    Archive 2004-12-01

  • We had Gypsy not quite two years when we found another little dog on the street, sweet and cheerful and completely housetrained, despite being covered in mange and infections.

    our world and how it got that way

  • Miss Laura always put on gloves when she went near him, and used a brush to wash him, for if a person takes mange from a dog, they may lose their hair and their eyelashes.

    Beautiful Joe: An Autobiography

  • in Danish mange tak and a long-standing wish that KNR will put their broadcasts on line already but I can't see anything wrong with 'Eskimo' for Eskimos or Gypsy for Romanis or Hungarian for Magyars, Finnish for Suomis etc. etc. etc.

    languagehat.com: LANGUAGE GUESSER.

  • She does not tempt me (much) because she is very young, very cute (underneath the mange, which is being treated) and well-behaved.

    Archive 2008-02-01

  • She does not tempt me (much) because she is very young, very cute (underneath the mange, which is being treated) and well-behaved.

    Snuggle Bug and Ornery get a bath!

  • If your pet is infested with scabies, (also called mange) and they have close contact with you, the mite can get under your skin and cause itching and skin irritation.

    Scabies

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