Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of numerous often brightly colored marine fishes of the family Labridae, having spiny fins and thick lips and valued for food and for home aquariums.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In New Zealand, Pseudolabrus bothryocosmus. Called also poddly, spotty, and kelp-fish.
  • noun An acanthopterygian teleost fish of the family Labridæ; any labrid, or labroid fish, having thick fleshy lips, strong sharp teeth, and usually brilliant coloration. See parrot-fish (with cut).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Zoöl.) Any one of numerous edible, marine, spiny-finned fishes of the genus Labrus, of which several species are found in the Mediterranean and on the Atlantic coast of Europe. Many of the species are bright-colored.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any one of numerous edible, marine, spiny-finned fishes of the genus Labrus, of which several species are found in the Mediterranean and on the Atlantic coast of Europe. Many of the species are bright-colored.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun chiefly tropical marine fishes with fleshy lips and powerful teeth; usually brightly colored

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Cornish gwragh and Welsh gwrach, old woman.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Cornish.

Examples

Comments

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  • OED suggests this is a variant on the spelling of "wraths", "wrath" being the name of this fish as derived from Cornish. A beautiful exclamation when a single wrath will not do, also compoundable, e.g. wrasse and ires! Of course it is a different meaning, but beautifully suggestive nonetheless

    April 16, 2013

  • "Few fish bones have survived, but we do have evidence of conger, bream, shark, skate, wrasse, ray, eel, haddock, limpets and other shellfish, most of which would have been impaled on sticks and set over glowing fires to cook."

    --Kate Colquhoun, Taste: The Story of Britain Through Its Cooking (NY: Bloomsbury, 2007), 12

    January 6, 2017