Comments by narniabound

  • Seanahan - That's GREAT. Thanks!

    January 22, 2008

  • From German mythology, associated with the legend of Siegfried, a fire drake

    January 21, 2008

  • Hey, thanks! Ever since I read James Byron Huggins book Leviathan, I've been curious about the historicity and mythology of dragons.

    January 21, 2008

  • Hey, thanks! Ever since I read James Byron Huggins book Leviathan, I've been curious about the historicity and mythology of dragons.

    January 21, 2008

  • From Babylonian mythology (creation story Enuma Elish)
    The Mother of the gods, depicted as a serpent-like creature

    January 21, 2008

  • From German mythology, associated with the legend of Siegfried, a fire drake

    January 21, 2008

  • From Babylonian mythology
    Found on the reconstructed Ishtar Gate
    "Derived from an Akkadian word loosely translated 'splendor serpent.' Although it is properly transliterated mûš-ruššû, early researchers mistakenly read it as sîr-ruššû" (Wikipedia).

    January 21, 2008

  • From Sumerian and Akkadian mythology
    "Depicted as a deity only in the Babylonian creation epic, the Enûma Elish"
    Aka, abzu or engur (name for mythological lake)
    (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • From Greek mythology
    "earth-dragon of Delphi"
    (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • Canaanite word for "Sea"
    Also titled Judge Nahar ("Judge River")
    One of the gods of the Levantine pantheon, frequently referred to as "the serpent"
    (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • From Greek mythology
    Ancient Greek: Τυφῶν
    Aka, Typhoeus (Τυφωε�?ς), Typhaon (Τυφάων) or Typhus (Τυφώς)
    (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • Aka, the Great Red Dragon mentioned in the Book of Revelation (Judeo-Christian and Islamic religions)

    January 21, 2008

  • From Moravian mythology
    Aka, the Brno Dragon

    January 21, 2008

  • From Chinese mythology
    Chinese: 敖明
    Dragon King of the North Sea (pinyin: Běihǎi Lóngwáng)
    Or Ao Shun (Chinese: 敖顺)
    (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • From Chinese mythology
    Chinese: 敖�?�
    Aka, Ao Run (Chinese: 敖闰)
    Dragon King of the West Sea (pinyin: Xīhǎi Lóngwáng)
    (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • Chinese: 敖钦
    Dragon King of the South Sea (pinyin: Nánhǎi Lóngwáng)
    Or Au Shun (Chinese: 敖顺)
    (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • From Chinese mythology
    Chinese: 敖广 or 敖光
    Dragon King of the East Sea (pinyin: D�?nghǎi Lóngwáng)
    (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • From Chinese mythology
    pinyin for: "Azure Dragon of the East"
    Traditional Chinese: �?�方�?��?
    (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • From Egyptian mythology
    Aka, Apepi, and Aapep, or Apophis (Greek)
    "Name is reconstructed by Egyptologists as *ʕAʔp�?pī because of written ʕ3pp(y), surviving into later Coptic as Aph�?ph" (Wikipedia).

    January 21, 2008

  • From Greek mythology
    Greek: Λε�?ναία �?δ�?α
    "An ancient nameless serpent-like chthonic water beast that possessed numerous heads— the poets mention more heads than the vase-painters could paint— and poisonous breath (Hyginus, 30). The Hydra of Lerna was killed by Hercules as one of his Twelve Labours" (Wikipedia).

    January 21, 2008

  • Legend from County Durham in northeast England

    January 21, 2008

  • From Japanese mythology
    �?神 "dragon god"
    Aka, Rinjin and Owatatsumi
    (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • From Hungarian mythology

    January 21, 2008

  • "Winged snake is a part of Tatar and Russian folklore...The Tatars themselves, on the other hand, frequently refer to this creature with the Persian word Ajdaha (Dragon) or Ajdaha-yılan (Dragon-snake)" (Wikipedia).

    January 21, 2008

  • Or Anzu
    From Akkadian mythology, son of the bird goddess Siris

    January 21, 2008

  • Or Zir
    Black Slavic dragon and god of sorcery

    January 21, 2008

  • From the tale of Lludd and Llefelys

    January 21, 2008

  • From Aztec mythology
    The fire-serpent, fire-snake, or Turquoise Serpent (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • Or Tarrasque
    Said to have come from Galatia...tamed by Saint Martha, who charmed it by singing it hymns and psalms. But the tamed dragon was killed by the terrified villagers (Wikipedia).

    January 21, 2008

  • Aka, the Dragon of Wawel Hill or the Wawel Dragon
    From Polish folklore

    January 21, 2008

  • Aka, Orochi or the Eight-Forked Serpent
    From Japanese mythology

    January 21, 2008

  • "A dialect word for a kind of water dragon, living in knuckerholes in Sussex, England. The word comes from the Anglo-Saxon 'nicor' which means 'water monster' and is used in the poem Beowulf." (Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • Aka Lawtan
    Aka Leviathan
    Seven-headed sea serpent or dragon of Ugaritic myths

    January 21, 2008

  • From Hittite mythology
    "Snake-demon who is crushed to death by the weather-god, symbolizing the beginning of a new era" (Encyclopedia Mythica).

    January 21, 2008

  • From Russian mythology, a dragon with three heads
    Cyrillic: Змей Горыныч

    January 21, 2008

  • Aka Fafnir
    From Norse mythology (Volsunga saga)

    January 21, 2008

  • From Albanian mythology
    A type of dragon (or a demonic dragon-like creature) with a long, coiled, serpentine body, four legs and small wings. This dragon sleeps throughout the whole year, only to wake on Saint George's Day, where its faceted silver eyes peer into the world. The Bolla does this until it sees a human. It devours the person, then closes its eyes and sleeps again.
    (From Wikipedia)

    January 21, 2008

  • From Persian mythology
    Aka, Azhi Dahaki

    January 21, 2008

  • A dragon in the Apocalypse of Abraham
    Used interchangeably with Rameel and Gadriel
    Aramaic: רמשנ�?ל
    Hebrew: עז�?זל Aze'ezel
    Arabic: عزازل Azazil
    First appearance is in Leviticus 16

    January 21, 2008

  • A water-dwelling dragon who lived near the Swat River and was converted to Buddhism

    January 21, 2008

  • The Rainbow Serpent of Dahomey mythology
    Aka, Ayida-Weddo, Aido Quedo

    January 21, 2008

  • Named dragon in Basque mythology, associated with the god Sugaar

    January 21, 2008

  • A dragon from Norse mythology who eats the roots of the World Tree, Yggdrasill
    Named in the Poetic Edda

    January 21, 2008

  • Dragon from Germanic mythology
    Alternate spelling: Jörmungandr
    Aka, Midgard Serpent or World Serpent, a sea serpent of the Norse mythology, the middle child of the giantess Angrboða and the god Loki.

    January 21, 2008

  • A mighty "long-worm" of the Grey Mountains
    Slain by Fram son of Frumgar (an ancestor of Eorl the Young)

    January 21, 2008

  • A winged fire-breathing dragon
    Last of the great dragons
    Slain in the Third Age by Bard

    January 21, 2008

  • Sindarin: anc 'jaw', alag 'impetuous'
    Bred by Morgoth in the First Age of Middle-Earth
    First of the winged 'fire-drakes'

    January 21, 2008