tcanny has looked up 1 word, created 1 list, listed 19 words, written 19 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 0 words.

Comments by tcanny

  • Coined in 1956 by Linda Sheron's then six-year-old brother, the word is still in use by friends and family, according to Linda, due to much more frequent Senior Moments. Something "zipappears" when you have it in your hand or on your desk, turn around and are unable to find it immediately thereafter. It's definition could be: to pass out of sight with a speed that suggests a sharp hissing or zipping sound.

    October 1, 2009

  • Found on the web both as a misspelling of "ecliptic" (pertaining to an eclipse) and "eclectic" (made up of or combining elements from a variety of sources) it suggests a combination of "eclectic" and "epileptic" (pertaining to a medical condition characterized by convulsive seizures) with a possible definition of: made up of or combining elements from such divergent and unrelated sources as to appear to be the result of a convulsive seizure.

    October 1, 2009

  • Young children are metaplastic word generating machines. How do they do it? This word was coined by one of Margaret Drew's daughters. "She couldn't quite get her tongue around 'tomorrow morning,'" explains Margaret. "So when I put her to bed at night, she'd say, 'see you toomorning' - much easier to say and I've never forgotten it (though that was almost 40 years ago)."

    This metaplastic word is interesting as a forensic signpost that shows the trend towards the creation of new words through contraction, i.e. good night becomes g'night. Now, 40 years later we see some of the most extreme examples with Instant Messaging abbreviations becoming words, i.e. lol, fwiw, brb.

    October 1, 2009

  • Pronounced /soo'doph a gus/ - n., a false esophagus.

    "During an operation for cancer of the esophagus the surgeon formed an esophageal extension to my stomach," explains Tim McElroy. "Upon learning of this work, I asked him if this extension could be medically referred to as a 'pseudophagus'. He stared at me blankly, shrugged his shoulders, and went on about his rounds."

    Always suckers for new medical and scientific names the metaplasm staff does not understand the doctor's apparent indifference to Tim's metaplastic breakthrough. We suspect he put on a poker face while rushing off to have the new word published under his name in Lancet or the New England Journal of Medicine.

    October 1, 2009

  • This is an example of the "Let's Invent an Unpronounceable Word Out of Two Perfectly Good Words" school of corporate naming. A combination of "collaborative" and "solutions" that ends up sounding a little too close to "collusion" to inspire confidence. Possible definition: Working together to solve problems through fraudulent, illegal or deceitful methods.

    October 1, 2009

  • "I like referring to accountants using sleight of hand in their accounting methods as presdifigurators", says Deb Wolf. So far no one has found it as amusing as me", she adds. Metaplasm staff points out that accountants aren't known for their sense of humor and that those taken advantage of by "presdifigurators" may not find anything laughable about their situation, but for what it's worth we think it's quite amusing.

    October 1, 2009

  • "I long ago began calling our housecats "flealines," for their tendency to track in the nasty little pests from their outdoor trips," says Connie Xenia Crouch. This reminds the metaplasm staff of another pet related metaplastic word coined to describe a gender confused dog that got a little too "friendly" with other male dogs in the neighborhood. Two points if you can guess the word.

    Well, since no one has had a crack at it yet I guess I'll give it away, the word I was looking for to describe a gender confused dog was "gaynine".

    September 30, 2009

  • A mixture of "plump" and "chubby" this word is attributed to Anne Collins Smith's grandmother who according to Smith, "used the term 'plubby' as a euphemism for "slightly overweight."

    September 30, 2009

  • An apparent misspelling of "women" by a fellow student in Kelly Snodgrass's class, Kelly points out that a possible meaning of this metaplastic word can be found after replacing the "w" with a "d". The Metaplasm staff wonders if all "wemons" wear red dresses.

    September 30, 2009

  • The foretelling of a planned action that will no doubt get you into a tough spot.

    September 30, 2009

  • Metaplastic homonyms like this one are a favorite of the Metaplasm team.

    “One that I heard my brother use a number of years ago was ‘weary’, as in ‘I’d be a little weary of doing that.’,�? Steve Terry explains. “Of course he meant either ‘leery’ or ‘wary’, but the inadvertant portmanteau was interesting in that ‘weary’ is something you might become if you were to do something you were leery or wary of.�?

    “Exactly right Steve,�? says Metaplasm staffer, Tim C. “I’m always weary of a trip to the in-laws and by the time the visit is over I’m weary from my trip to the in-laws.�?

    September 30, 2009

  • According to Monica L. Miceli, acrofiti is a combination of acrobatics and graffiti. It refers to the stunning physical prowess and steady artistic hand that graffiti artists must possess to paint their renderings in unexpected places, such as busy freeway overhangs and ladderless roadside billboards, without killing themselves. Although experts have never seen acrofiti in action, the proof lies in the existence of the art.

    September 30, 2009

  • Synthesized and submitted by Maryellen Read, hostiltality is the antonym of hospitality and can describe the reception received when visiting the in-law’s or stopping by your ex’s to ask if you can have your stuff back.

    September 30, 2009

  • Submitted by Mike Driscoll, “supurban�? is a metaplastic word useful for describing something “superb�? that’s located in a “suburban�? part of a city. Proper usage: “Yes, they sold both of their lofts and bought a supurban house in Arlington.�?

    September 30, 2009

  • Found as a misspelling of “massacre�? in a school project on the “Massacre of the Infants�? referred to in the Bible’s New Testament Infancy Narratives.

    Though the definition of “massacure�? - the killing of large numbers of humans or animals as a method or course of action used to correct a harmful or disturbing situation - could be used to describe Herod’s order, it would hopefully be used more often in the modern world in reference to eliminating animal borne diseases such as SARS and BSE (Mad Cow Disease).

    September 30, 2009

  • Clint McInnes contributed this metaplastic word which cropped up in a reader’s comment on Anu Garg’s excellent A.Word.A.Day Compendium of Feedback.

    Clyde Dawson wrote: “At a recent planning meeting, our chairman referred to our facilitator as ‘felicitator’ and the word has stuck fast. It will ever be part of our vocab for the one who leads the fun part of a meeting.�?

    September 30, 2009

  • Heard on NPR by an interviewee, this metaplastic contraction appears to be a severe shortening of “it has been my pleasure�? and is used as an alternate response to “You’re welcome�? when presented with the phrase “Thank you�?.

    September 30, 2009

  • Glocal is another metaplastic word submitted by prolific contributor Clint McInnes.

    Clint says, “I saw this one in a trade journal advertisement. It is a combination of “global�? and “local�?, and was used to describe the abilities of a parts distributor. They claim to source and serve both globally and locally, borrowing the best aspects of each approach.�?

    September 30, 2009

  • Heard as a mispronounciation of skirmish. Possible definitions:

    1) A minor battle fought between small gangs of worms.
    2) Relating to or feeling/exhibiting signs of humiliation or embarrassment. As in “A squirmish feeling washed over James the moment the reporter asked him about the incriminating video from the hidden cameras.�?

    September 30, 2009

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