Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to adumbration

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Faintly representing; typical.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Shadowing forth; faintly resembling; foreshadowing or typical.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. indistinctly prophetic

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Like the somber Hawthorne's, his style is brooding, adumbrative, rather than incisive or brilliant, and it often limps among the facts of his story like a man in pain.

    Definitions: Essays in Contemporary Criticism

  • We claim to stand there, as mute monuments, pathetically adumbrative of much.

    The French Revolution

  • Whilst the Evolution title may lack certain aesthetic properties, in relation to insignificant details such as stadium names and uniform branding, it more than makes up for this with an adumbrative and delineative appearance that focuses on the movement and athletic mannerisms of its pixelated contestants, rather than sacrificing gameplay gratification in order to look more appealing to a footer-sim novice (dare I suggest, one like yourself?)

    Pocket-lint

  • In 1982, she became a medical adumbrative to Ethicla Ltd for a year, afore spending a year in Zambia as the arch of a affiliation school, area her bedmate ran a chestnut mine. 1

    Labour of Love

  • I liked the interview because of exchanges like the one below-but am posting it mostly because I dig it very much when an Indian writer is introduced thusly: "X who has very dark hair and adumbrative eyes yet seems to emit brightness …" (The picture is interesting too, presenting PM as a cross between a character actor in a Hindi film poster and a psychedelic hippie on the Buddha trail.)

    Amitava Kumar

  • "suggestive and adumbrative manner" -- not, indeed, he acknowledges, a romantic manner, and yet "quite distinct from the classical"; i.e., because of the transcendental character of a portion of his poetry.

    A History of English Romanticism in the Nineteenth Century

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  • Mishra—who has very dark hair and adumbrative eyes yet seems to emit brightness - the believer mag

    September 7, 2007