Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of amorist.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See amorist.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Shams al Nahar, the amourist martyrs, as Burton calls them, has too much philandering.

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

  • "He is a great amourist, too, they tell me, and very passionate in his love-making!"

    The Soul of the War

  • It may seem unfair to over-emphasize the voluptuary in Mr. Pepys, but it is Mr. Pepys, the promiscuous amourist; stringing his lute (God forgive him!) on a Sunday, that is the outstanding figure in the Diary.

    The Art of Letters

  • The tale of King Omar, however, has too much fighting, just as that of Ali bin Bakkar and Shams al Nahar, the amourist martyrs, as Burton calls them, has too much philandering.

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

  • Since thou dost award such punishment to wretched amourist, never more after this will I steal kisses.

    The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus

  • Thus she saith! but what a woman tells an ardent amourist ought fitly to be graven on the breezes and in running waters.

    The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus

  • The lover escapes scot-free because Moslems, as well as Hindus, hold that the amourist under certain conditions is justified in obtaining his object by fair means or foul.

    Arabian nights. English

  • Prince had no complaint save that he was a hot amourist and distraught of vitals.

    Arabian nights. English

  • Eastern love-tales are always bonne fourchettes: they eat and drink hard enough to scandalise the sentimental amourist of the West; but it is understood that this abundant diet is necessary to qualify them for the Herculean labours of the love night.

    Arabian nights. English

  • Poems that were raised "from the heat of youth, or the vapours of wine, like that which flows at waste from the pen of some vulgar amourist, or the trencher fury of a rhyming parasite," were in his eyes treachery to the poet's high vocation.

    Milton

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