Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To remark or comment critically, usually with strong disapproval or censure: "a man . . . who animadverts on miserly patients, egocentric doctors, psychoanalysis and Lucky Luciano with evenhanded fervor” ( Irwin Faust).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To consider.
  • v. To turn judicial attention (to); to punish or criticise.
  • v. To criticise, censure.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To take notice; to observe; -- commonly followed by that.
  • intransitive v. To consider or remark by way of criticism or censure; to express censure; -- with on or upon.
  • intransitive v. To take cognizance judicially; to inflict punishment.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To take cognizance or notice.
  • To comment critically; make remarks by way of criticism or censure; pass strictures or criticisms.
  • Synonyms Of animadvert upon: To comment upon, criticize, disapprove, reprehend, blame, censure.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. express blame or censure or make a harshly critical remark
  • v. express one's opinion openly and without fear or hesitation

Etymologies

Middle English animadverten, to notice, from Latin animadvertere : animus, mind; see anə- in Indo-European roots + advertere, to turn toward; see adverse.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin animadverto, from animum ("mind") + adverto ("turn to"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Turning is so versatile: avert invert revert animadvert pervert evert convert divert revert.

    Justine Lai paints herself having sex with each of the Presidents, beginning with George Washington.

  • The Nabob finding his time after dinner hang somewhat heavy on his hand, and the moon being tolerably bright, had, one harvest evening, sought his usual remedy for dispelling ennui by a walk to the Manse, where he was sure, that, if he could not succeed in engaging the minister himself in some disputation, he would at least find something in the establishment to animadvert upon and to restore to order.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • The landlord, John Mengs, who had assumed a seat somewhat elevated at the head of the table, did not omit to observe this mark of insubordination, and to animadvert upon it.

    Anne of Geierstein

  • As Clarissa writes, “it would have shown a particularity that a vain man would construe to his advantage, and which my sister would not fail to animadvert upon.”

    It Begins « So Many Books

  • And certainly it must, when it can be the cause of the letter I have before me, and which I must no farther animadvert upon, because you forbid me to do so.

    Clarissa Harlowe

  • Nor have I been solicitous to animadvert, as thou wentest along, upon thy inventions, and their tendency.

    Clarissa Harlowe

  • He would say a word to her when he was dressing, assuring her that he had not intended to animadvert in the slightest degree upon her own conduct.

    He Knew He Was Right

  • I shall not take upon me to animadvert upon this; but certain it is, that Johnson paid great attention to Taylor.

    The Life of Samuel Johnson LL.D.

  • I presumed to animadvert on his eulogy on Garrick, in his Lives of the Poets.

    The Life of Samuel Johnson LL.D.

  • It is not our business to animadvert upon these lines; we are not critics, but historians.

    The Blue Fairy Book

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Comments

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  • "If I animadvert on Rackham it's because of what happened to Mr & Mrs Ralph this week."
    Psychogeography by Will Self, 197

    October 17, 2010

  • Ha!

    August 28, 2008

  • "I know this will sound odd to the American English speaker, but in Europe to animadvert “Hell is other people’s pants�? would leave one open to charges of filthy-mindedness, and possibly a visit from the authorities."

    The New York Times, Garment District, by Will Self, August 26, 2008

    August 28, 2008