Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. anthelmintic

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Since the 1968 meeting of the OAU/STRC on medicinal plants of Africa, held in Dakar, Senegal, and several African countries have started screening their medicinal plants for biocactive principles such as antimicrobial, antihelmintic, antihypertensive, antisickling, antiviral, antimalarial etc.

    Chapter 7

  • '''Thiabendazole''' is an [[antihelmintic]] drug, a type of [[pharmaceutical]] used to treat worm infections.

    SourceWatch - Recent changes [en]

  • '''Thiabendazole''' is an [[antihelmintic]] drug, a type of [[pharmaceutical]] used to treat worm infections

    SourceWatch - Recent changes [en]

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Comments

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  • It's conversations like this that make me love Wordie.

    October 19, 2009

  • And completing the set, in Google Books, anthelmintic is actually the most common of the four spellings.

    October 13, 2009

  • See aphelion for similar comments.

    October 13, 2009

  • Ball is quoting a nineteenth-century source (a country doctor), so undoubtedly it's a question of either a misspelling or a non-standard spelling of the time period.

    October 13, 2009

  • And indeed of anthelminthic, the best-formed derivative from the Greek. The prefix anti- assimilates to a following h.

    Conceivably, the change of one of the two <th>'s to <t> could be an authentic reflection of Greek phonetics: Grassmann's law. If the ancient Greeks themselves ever used this word, it would have dissimilated one of the <th>'s. But it's not in Liddell & Scott so I'm afraid that makes it a mere spelling mistake.

    October 13, 2009

  • Variant of antihelminthic.

    October 13, 2009

  • "Intestinal worms were a common ailment, especially among the young, many of whom died from them. To one girl, McCormick gave '3 antihelmintic powders,' hoping to kill the parasites."
    —Edward Ball, Slaves in the Family (NY: Ballantine Books, 1998), 247

    October 13, 2009