Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A drunkard.
  • n. A bottle for wine made of pigskin.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A large leathern bottle or bag, used in Spain and throughout the Levant for holding wine or other liquor; a wine-skin (now the current name in English).
  • n. Hence A drunkard, as if a mere wine-bottle.

Etymologies

From Spanish borracho ("drunkard, wine bottle"), from Latin burrus ("red, flushed"), from Ancient Greek πυρρός (pyrrhos, "tawny, red") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • We should have drunk our wine poisoned with the villanous odor of the borachio, had not some Eastern merchants, lighting their fires in the Desert, marked the strange composition which now glitters on our sideboards, and holds the costly produce of our vines.

    The Fitz-Boodle Papers

  • D'ye think my niece will ever endure such a borachio?

    Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol. 1 A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook

  • Port and sherry of British manufacture, and the water with an incredible borachio, essence of tar; so that tea and coffee are but derisive names.

    Letters from the Cape

  • Under the deep shade of some tall trees, sheltered from the noonday sun, we lay down to rest ourselves and enjoy a most patriarchal dinner, -- some dry biscuits, a few bunches of grapes, and a little weak wine, savoring more of the borachio-skin than the vine-juice, were all we boasted; yet they were not ungrateful at such a time and place.

    Charles O'Malley — Volume 1

  • -- We should have drunk our wine poisoned with the villanous odor of the borachio, had not some Eastern merchants, lighting their fires in the Desert, marked the strange composition which now glitters on our sideboards, and holds the costly produce of our vines.

    The Fitz-Boodle Papers

  • No sooner were these words spoken, when Panurge coming up towards her, after the ceremonial performance of a profound and humble salutation, presented her with six neat’s tongues dried in the smoke, a great butter-pot full of fresh cheese, a borachio furnished with good beverage, and a ram’s cod stored with single pence, newly coined.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • a great butter-pot full of fresh cheese, a borachio furnished with good beverage, and a ram's cod stored with single pence, newly coined.

    Gargantua and Pantagruel, Illustrated, Book 3

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  • After Borachio, a drunken follower of Don Juan in Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing. But the word had already entered English, in the leather wine bottle or bag sense, shortly before Shakespeare appropriated it for his character. — The Orthoepist

    September 13, 2011

  • An eponym? After whom?

    May 20, 2008

  • Eponym: a drunkard. (from WordCraft)

    May 20, 2008