Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A piece of scored and broiled fish, fowl, or meat.
  • transitive v. To score and broil (fish, fowl, or meat).
  • transitive v. To slice or cut.
  • n. A form of opaque or dark-colored diamond used for drills. Also called black diamond.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Meat or fish that has been scored and broiled.
  • v. To cut and cook something in this manner.
  • v. To cut or hack, as in combat.
  • n. A black diamond used in drilling.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A black variety of diamond, found in Brazil, and used for diamond drills. It occurs in irregular or rounded fragments, rarely distinctly crystallized, with a texture varying from compact to porous.
  • transitive v. To cut (meat) across for frying or broiling; to cut or slice and broil.
  • transitive v. To cut or hack, as in fighting.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Same as carbonade.
  • n. Same as bort, 2.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a piece of meat (or fish) that has been scored and broiled
  • n. an inferior dark diamond used in industry for drilling and polishing

Etymologies

From Spanish carbonada, from carbón, charcoal, from Latin carbō, carbōn-; see carbon.
Portuguese, from carbone, carbon, from French; see carbon.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Spanish carbonada, from carbón, charcoal (Wiktionary)
Portuguese carbonado, carbonated (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Also known as carbonado, the black diamond is the oldest, toughest and rarest diamond found only in Brazil and Africa.

    WebWire | Recent Headlines

  • We handed in our second 3000 word essay On carbonado diamonds in my case pretty much on the last day of term.

    Snell-Pym » Stress

  • The new data support earlier research by Haggerty showing that carbonado diamonds formed in stellar supernovae explosions.

    January 9th, 2007

  • If he do come in my way, so: if he do not, if I come in his willingly, let him make a carbonado of me.

    The first part of King Henry the Fourth

  • No man in England durst say so much — I would flay him, carbonado him!

    The Adventures of Roderick Random

  • He had added only a black cape that sparkled like carbonado and a tall bunch of black feathers fastened behind the cockade of his broad brimmed hat.

    The Golden Torc

  • They took only a few of the rubies and sapphires the next morning but they gathered more of the diamonds, looking in particular for the gray-black and ugly but very hard and tough carbonado variety.

    Space Prison

  • Draw, you rogue, or I’ll so carbonado your shanks: draw, you rascal; come your ways.

    Act II. Scene II. King Lear

  • He was too hard for him, —directly to say the truth on ’t: before Corioli he scotched him and notched him like a carbonado.

    Act IV. Scene V. Coriolanus

  • If he do come in my way, so: if he do not, if I come in his, willingly, let him make a carbonado of me.

    Act V. Scene III. The First Part of King Henry the Fourth

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Comments

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  • "Draw, you rogue, or I'll so carbonado your shanks."
    Kent, King Lear II.ii

    September 11, 2009

  • "FIRST SERVANT: He was too hard for him directly, to say the truth on't; before Corioli he scotched him and notched him like a carbonado."
    - William Shakespeare, 'The Tragedy of Coriolanus'.

    August 29, 2009