Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a Bantu language spoken by the Chaga in northern Tanzania

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He was dressed like the others in a girdled chaga of coarse serge, but wore a red cap turned up over the ears with fine fur, a silver inkhorn, and a Yarkand knife in a chased silver sheath in his girdle, and canary-coloured leather shoes with turned-up points.

    Among the Tibetans

  • The chaga mushroom is an adaptogen that grows on white birch trees, extracting the birch constituents and is used as a remedy for cancer.

    Find Me A Cure

  • Maitake, shiitake, chaga, and reishi are prominent among those being researched for their potential anti-cancer, anti-viral, or immunity-enhancing properties.

    Color + Design Blog by COLOURlovers / Feed

  • I was checking the Press of the web site and I notice that there is a article from “El Universal” do you speak spanish???? and have you realized that your blog is read not just in U.S.???? chaga May 1 best.eggnog. ever. just don’t go light with the nutmeg! also, it is perfect with whiskey, perfectly subtle!

    Eggnog Ricotta Cheesecake | Baking Bites

  • Chahzoda - Chetire chaga (Radio Edit Radu Sibu Remix) 05.

    Free Downloads Archive - Popular services - RapidShare, DepositFiles, Megaupload, Mediafire, HotFile, Uploading, Easy-Share, FileFactory, Vip-File, Shared

  • "The antimutagenic action of the molecules found in the white part of birch bark where chaga feeds inhibits free-radical oxidation and also induces the production of interferons, which helps induce DNA repair.

    NaturalNews.com

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  • "... I had exchanged my stocks for quantities of wild ginseng, cohosh, and—a real rarity—a chaga. This item, a huge warty fungus that grows from ancient birch trees, had a reputation—or so I was told—for the cure of cancer, tuberculosis, and ulcers. A useful item...."
    —Diana Gabaldon, The Fiery Cross (NY: Bantam Dell, 2001), 1046

    January 29, 2010