Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of several plants of the genus Panax, especially P. pseudoginseng of eastern Asia or P. quinquefolius of North America, having small greenish flowers grouped in umbels, palmately compound leaves, and forked roots believed to have medicinal properties.
  • n. The roots of these plants.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of several plants, of the genus Panax, having forked roots supposed to have medicinal properties.
  • n. The root of such a plant, or an extract of these roots.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A plant of the genus Aralia, the root of which is highly valued as a medicine among the Chinese. The Chinese plant (Aralia Schinseng) has become so rare that the American (A. quinquefolia) has largely taken its place, and its root is now an article of export from America to China. The root, when dry, is of a yellowish white color, with a sweetness in the taste somewhat resembling that of licorice, combined with a slight aromatic bitterness.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A plant of the genus Aralia (Panax); also, the root of this plant, which is highly valued as a tonic and stimulant by the Chinese, who ascribe to it almost miraculous powers.
  • n. Several plants not botanically related to the ginseng have been so named as possessing similar medical properties, as, in Georgia, the sunflower-like composite Tetragonotheca helianthoides.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. Chinese herb with palmately compound leaves and small greenish flowers and forked aromatic roots believed to have medicinal powers
  • n. aromatic root of ginseng plants

Etymologies

Chinese (Mandarin) rén shēn : rén, man + shēn, ginseng (perhaps from the forked shape of the root).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Mandarin trad. 人蔘, simpl. 人参 (pinyin: rénshēn). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Today, there are three different herbs that fall under the label ginseng.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

  • The Lady Om and I searched two seasons and found a single root of the wild mountain ginseng, which is esteemed so rare and precious a thing by the doctors that the Lady Om and I could have lived a year in comfort from the sale of our one root.

    Chapter 15

  • This beverage's label doesn't say how much taurine and ginseng is in the bottle.

    4 Waters Enhanced With 100% Hype - The Consumerist

  • The strongest thing any medical work will say for ginseng is that it is "a very mild and soothing drug."

    Gene Stratton-Porter: A Little Story of The Life and Work and Ideals of "The Bird Woman"

  • The ginseng is a real El Dorado of treasure to the Dukhobors, and it ought to be celebrated in poetry.

    Janey Canuck in the West

  • He is complaining that if the Dukhobors buy tea or sugar the grocer weighs the paper with it, but will not do so when he buys ginseng from the Dukhobor.

    Janey Canuck in the West

  • Ingredients such as ginseng, which is said to decrease stress, taurine, an organic acid that is a major constituent of bile, and ginkgo biloba, a unique species of tree found in parts of Asia that is said to increase cognitive functioning, are all ultra-modern titles for elements that don't have scientifically backed advantages.

    The Rebel Yell

  • All submitted comments are subject to the rules set forth in our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. from kolbster wrote 47 weeks 5 days ago all that you want from ginseng is the root and the berry, the root is used in medications, in the 2007 ginseng season the root was selling for $800 for a dried pound, and yes most states hove a season. the berries arent used for any thing, put you can plant them where you know where you know where it is. the berries are POISON do not eat them. ginseng also doesnt grow every year. most of the time it comes up every other year. dont ask me why.

    Ginseng picking

  • All Replies from kolbster wrote 47 weeks 5 days ago all that you want from ginseng is the root and the berry, the root is used in medications, in the 2007 ginseng season the root was selling for $800 for a dried pound, and yes most states hove a season. the berries arent used for any thing, put you can plant them where you know where you know where it is. the berries are POISON do not eat them. ginseng also doesnt grow every year. most of the time it comes up every other year. dont ask me why.

    Ginseng picking

  • One famous negative report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association described the so-called ginseng abuse syndrome.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

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