Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Archaic An executioner.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An executioner; a headsman or hangman.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An executioner; a headsman or hangman.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An executioner; a hangman; one who executes the extreme penalty of the law; one who kills.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And for that shag-haird Slave in the house, he will be thy deathsman, if hee but understand that thou makest any enquirie after thy money.

    The Decameron

  • A deathsman of the soul Robert Greene called him, Stephen said.

    Ulysses

  • -- A deathsman of the soul Robert Greene called him, Stephen said.

    Ulysses

  • Judge, axe, and deathsman veiled! and my poor eyes

    Poems

  • I should see thee once more before the deathsman blinds me.

    Rienzi, Last of the Roman Tribunes

  • Nearer and nearer press the populace, -- another moment, and the deathsman is defrauded.

    Zanoni

  • "Yet our solemn rites deceived us not; the prophet-shadows, dark with terror and red with blood, still foretold that, even in the dungeon, and before the deathsman, I, -- I had the power to save them both!"

    Zanoni

  • From his arms thou shalt start with horror, as from those of thy wronged father's betrayer, -- perchance his deathsman!

    The Last of the Barons — Volume 11

  • As he approached the city, all that festive and gallant scene he had quitted seemed to him like a dream; a vision of the gardens and bowers of an enchantress, from which he woke abruptly as a criminal may wake on the morning of his doom to see the scaffold and the deathsman; -- so much did each silent and lonely step into the funeral city bring back his bewildered thoughts at once to life and to death.

    Rienzi, Last of the Roman Tribunes

  • And when I see before me the faded king of a great race, and the last band of doomed heroes, too few and too feeble to make head against my arms, -- when the land is already my own, and the sword is that of the deathsman, not of the warrior, -- verily, Sir Norman, duty releases its iron tool, and man becomes man again. "

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Volume 07

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  • Those who were condemned to be smothered to death by sinking downe into the softe bottome of an high built bedde of roses, neuer dide so sweete a death as I shoulde die, if her rose coloured disdaine were my deathsman.

    - Thomas Nashe, The Unfortunate Traveller, 1594

    March 6, 2010