Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A line of verse consisting of two metrical feet.
  • n. A line of verse consisting of two measures of two feet each, especially one in iambic, trochaic, or anapestic meter in classical prosody.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A line in a poem having two metrical feet.
  • n. A poetic metre in which each line has two feet.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Having two poetical measures or meters.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In prosody, consisting of two measures; divisible into two feet or dipodies.
  • n. In prosody, a verse or period consisting of two feet or dipodies: as, an Ionic dimeter; iambic dimeters.

Etymologies

Late Latin dimeter, dimetrus, having two verses, from Greek dimetros : di-, two; see di-1 + metron, meter; see meter1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • This twelfth poem or hymn contains 52 iambic dimeter strophes, and an irregular selection from its 208 lines has furnished four hymns to the Roman Breviary, all of which conclude with the usual Marian doxology "Jesu tibi sit gloria" etc., not composed by Prudentius, slightly varied to make the doxology appropriate for the several feasts employing the hymns.

    Archive 2008-08-01

  • Written by Coelius Sedulius d c 450 in iambic dimeter.

    An Office Hymn Tune Compendium, Part VI

  • Because the fact is, when we read "The Cat in the Hat," we are not thinking anapestic dimeter, we are not marveling at the ease with which Seuss manipulates this first-grade vocabulary list.

    The Cat (and Hat) That Came to Stay

  • Like any other great man who dominates his time, St. Ambrose had many imitators, and it so happened that hymns written by his contemporaries or those who came after him, in the form which he used, that is, the Iambic dimeter, were called "Hymni Ambrosiani".

    Archive 2005-07-01

  • Iambic, Trochaic, and Anapaestic verses are further designated as dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, according to _the number of dipodies_ (pairs of feet) which they contain.

    New Latin Grammar

  • In every stanza there are four short lines of _dactylic dimeter_.

    Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 7

  • He is, perhaps, least unsuccessful in his treatment of the Anapaest: the lines do not lack melody, and the natural flexibility of the metre saves them from extreme monotony, though they would have been more successful had he employed the paroemiac line as a solemn and resonant close to the march of the dimeter.

    Post-Augustan Poetry From Seneca to Juvenal

  • This twelfth poem or hymn contains 52 iambic dimeter strophes, and an irregular selection from its 208 lines has furnished four hymns to the Roman Breviary, all of which conclude with the usual Marian doxology ( "Jesu tibi sit gloria" etc., not composed by Prudentius), slightly varied to make the doxology appropriate for the several feasts employing the hymns.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Some continue the liturgical tradition of Saint Ambrose, and are written in the Ambrosian iambic dimeter; others are an attempt to enlist the metres of Horace in the service of Christian lyrical poetry.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • This versus popularis and the iambic dimeter are the two metres in which most of the early Christian hymns were written, both in Latin and in Greek.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

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