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Etymologies

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Examples

  • The foregoing sounds like a paragraph from "Midshipman Easy" or the "Water Witch," rather than a paragraph from the soberest, faithfullest, and most literal chronicle of the sea ever written.

    A CLASSIC OF THE SEA

  • The affectionate animal seemed to mourn the loss of his master, and while sometimes she indulged herself in fancifully telling him her fears, she imagined she read in his countenance the faithfullest sympathy.

    Cecilia

  • Kindlier and more constant than the faithfullest of slaves — this is that possession best named all-serviceable. 173 Consider what the post is that he assigns himself! to meet and supplement what is lacking to the welfare of his friends, to promote their private and their public interests, is his concern.

    Memorabilia

  • Mr Sparkler had been other than the faithfullest and most submissive of swains, he was sufficiently hard pressed to have fled from the scene of his trials, and have set at least the whole distance from Rome to London between himself and his enchantress.

    Little Dorrit

  • In short, you are a charming girl; and Lady Betty says so too; and moreover adds, that if he makes you not the best and faithfullest of husbands, he cannot deserve you, for all his fortune and birth.

    Pamela

  • Sir, the blessings of one of the faithfullest and worthiest hearts in the kingdom.

    Pamela

  • How can you thus torture the faithfullest heart in the world?

    Clarissa Harlowe

  • Curse upon the heart of the little devil, said I, who instigates you to think so hardly of the faithfullest heart in the world!

    Clarissa Harlowe

  • He clasped me to the faithfullest of human hearts.

    Sir Charles Grandison

  • Pullen, yea their verie Dogges, the truest and faithfullest servants to men, being beaten and banished from their houses, went wildly wandring abroad in the fields, where the Corne grew still on the ground without gathering, or being so much as reapt or cut.

    The Decameron

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