Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A pipe for the conveyance of gas.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For the men in the barricade had made themselves two small cannons out of two cast-iron lengths of gas-pipe, plugged up at one end with tow and fire-clay.

    Les Miserables

  • Okay, how about a checkers match instead...or maybe a closed-course crit in downtown Spartanburg on matching gas-pipe Huffies?

    Mallrats: Where Trends Go To Die

  • A single two-arm gas-pipe descended from the center of the ceiling.

    The Financier

  • There is probably no one capable of thinking and feeling who has not occasionally looked at a gas-pipe chair and reflected that the machine is the enemy of life.

    The Road to Wigan Pier

  • But the question returns whether this gas-pipe is also a water-pipe; in other words, whether the spout of the Sperm Whale is the mere vapor of the exhaled breath, or whether that exhaled breath is mixed with water taken in at the mouth, and discharged through the spiracle.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Now, the spouting canal of the Sperm Whale, chiefly intended as it is for the conveyance of air, and for several feet laid along, horizontally, just beneath the upper surface of his head, and a little to one side; this curious canal is very much like a gas-pipe laid down in a city on one side of a street.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • He had chosen his own cloth in the end, a bright brown tweed with gas-pipe trousers.

    At Swim, Two Boys

  • And the deep-toned voice of the digger replied -- "We're laying a gas-pipe down!"

    The Impact of Natural Gas on the United Kingdom

  • The description of this boat says that it looks exactly like a long gas-pipe.

    The Great Round World and What Is Going On In It, Vol. 1, No. 37, July 22, 1897 A Weekly Magazine for Boys and Girls

  • Meditations about the main gas-pipe of a great city, -- if the supply were to be stopped, what would happen?

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 102, April, 1866

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