Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Intuitive apprehension of spiritual truths, an esoteric form of knowledge sought by the Gnostics.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An immanent form of knowledge or transcendent insight, such as sought by the Gnostics.
  • n. Act or process of knowing.
  • n. An altered state of awareness in which the will is magically effective.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The deeper wisdom; knowledge of spiritual truth, such as was claimed by the Gnostics.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Science; knowledge; knowledge of the highest kind; specifically, mystical knowledge. See Gnostic.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. intuitive knowledge of spiritual truths; said to have been possessed by ancient Gnostics

Etymologies

Greek gnōsis, knowledge, from gignōskein, gnō-, to know; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Ancient Greek γνῶσις (gnō̃sis, "knowledge"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Along with Gnostics (from the Greek word "gnosis" meaning knowledge) they were persecuted, anathematised and systematically and progressively oppressed.

    Al-Ahram Weekly Online

  • Gnosticism—derived from gnosis, the Greek word for knowledge—grew alongside early Christianity.

    2007 August | the blog of author, illustrator and designer Kris Waldherr

  • Others, he noted, were quite sure they had attained a certain 'gnosis' - had, more or less successfully, solved the problem of existence; while I was quite sure I had not, and had a pretty strong conviction that the problem was insoluble.

    The God Delusion

  • They were quite sure they had attained a certain "gnosis" -- had, more or less successfully, solved the problem of existence; while I was quite sure I had not, and had a pretty strong conviction that the problem was insoluble.

    Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley — Volume 1

  • However, it can also be perverted to serve destructive ambitions - primarily by interlaced sanctions and votive misdirections that amplify the role of nationalistic religious bureaucracies - or substitute a placebo myth of lazy boy redemption that reduces the opportunity for acquired "gnosis" - a psycho active process that in fact rests upon placing everything in the balance of personal observation and allowing Occam to function within various self-reflective realms of personal consciousness.

    Propeller Most Popular Stories

  • The objective trail commonly reflects the same imprint - or "blueprint" and therefore becomes religiously valid through actual praxis or applied "gnosis" - with the actual encounter typically amounting to the dissolution of personal ego states into a unitary sense of at-one-ment commonly described as harmonious alignment with a more expansive "meta reality".

    Propeller Most Popular Stories

  • "gnosis" -- had, more or less successfully, solved the problem of existence; while I was quite sure I had not, and had a pretty strong conviction that the problem was insoluble.

    Thomas Henry Huxley A Character Sketch

  • The truth is that the rejection of Creator and creation, which Marcion shares with the wide stream of so-called gnosis, generated not only an ascetical contempt for the body, but also a cynical libertinism, for this too displays in reality a hatred of the body, of man, and of the world … In the false ascetism that is hostile to creation, the body becomes a dirty bag of maggots that deserves only disdain or, indeed, ill treatment.

    DogfightAtBankstown

  • A complex movement popularly known as Gnosticism (from the Greek "gnosis," meaning knowledge) offered an apparently compelling and appealing version of Christianity in which believers sought, in addition to received teaching, "inner knowledge" of God.

    The Birth of Jesus

  • At Ephesus we may detect the adepts of an incipient Gnosticism in St. Paul's warnings against giving heed to "fables and endless genealogies" (I Tim., i, 4) and against "profane and vain babblings and oppositions of 'gnosis' falsely so-called" (I Tim., vi, 20).

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 15: Tournely-Zwirner

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  • Intuitive knowledge of spiritual truth.

    July 10, 2007