Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. wearing a heavy coat

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Instead, she spots the large, limping, heavy-coated man who came through with the white tear.

    INSIDE OF A DOG

  • Not that his form of language was at all picayune, for he never augmented gouge in the shiny patois of his environment, but the tone and tenor of his mobile home window awnings were of such heavy-coated wildness, that none might listen without apprehension.

    Think Progress » Outsourcing Torture

  • So she sat gazing out of the limousine window, as though all her interest were in the drab houses lining the way, and the heavy-coated pedestrians moving along the sidewalks of the narrow streets through which they were passing.

    The Man in the Twilight

  • Except the dogs of the Factor's train, there were few real "huskies," as Eskimo dogs are called, for most of the brutes were the usual sharp-nosed, heavy-coated mongrels that in the Strong Woods Country go by the name of _giddes_; some, however, had been sired by wolves.

    The Drama of the Forests Romance and Adventure

  • The heavy-coated and mufflered man was walking quickly southward; he waved his umbrella to a passing cab, which, however, did not pull up.

    The Town Traveller

  • Once the sun peaked across the whiteness Wednesday morning, heavy-coated people began recovering their driveways and venturing back out, in many cases, onto plowed roads and highways.

    Kansas City Star: Front Page

  • Half an hour before Vince Gill went on stage for his first of three sold out artist-in-residence shows, people were milling about in the dimly lit lobby of the Country Music Hall of Fame-everyone from heavy-coated slightly-grayed businessmen to a regular guy in a VFW ball cap to a shapely young brunette.

    The 9513

  • Burly, heavy-coated, scalded by the cold outside, eight thousand writers bump and shuffle through the glittering halls of the Chicago Hilton, and suspiciously eye the stuffed elevators, lest they be shoved next to some needy graduate from the Depression State U. writing program.

    The Chicago Blog

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