Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who deals in hose or stocking, or in goods knit or woven like hose.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who deals in hose or stocking, or in goods knit or woven like hose.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who deals in hose (stockings and socks), or in goods knitted or woven like hose, such as undergarments, jerseys, cardigans, and the like. Formerly this term was applied to tailors who sold men's garments ready-made.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a tradesman who sells hosiery and (in England) knitwear

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The young man in the balcony of a theatre who displays a gorgeous waistcoat for the benefit of the fair owners of opera glasses, has very probably no socks in his wardrobe, for the hosier is another of the genus of weevils that nibble at the purse.

    Father Goriot

  • The young man in the balcony of a theater who displays a gorgeous waistcoat for the benefit of the fair owners of opera glasses, has very probably no socks in his wardrobe, for the hosier is another of the genus of weevils that nibble at the purse.

    Paras. 800–899

  • “A bricklayer?” said Mr Harrel, “ay, sure, and a hosier too; sit down, Mr Simkins, keep your place, man!”

    Cecilia

  • He is said to have been a hosier; but what, after all, was a hosier in the seventeenth century?

    The Common Reader, Second Series

  • So that, notwithstanding the most parsimonious economy, I ran in debt to my landlord, who seized my effects; and an hosier, from whom I had received some parcels upon credit, took out a writ against me, by virtue of which

    The Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom

  • This vigilant grocer and butterman, tea, coffee, tobacco, and snuffman, hosier also, and general provider for the outer as well as the inner man, had much of that enterprise in his nature which the country believes to come from London.

    Springhaven

  • With her other hand she was pulling along a poor puny little fellow, his face covered with scrofula, the son of a Rouen hosier, whom his parents, too taken up with their business, left in the country.

    Madame Bovary

  • For a sum of five thousand francs he disposed of the fruits of his industry to a retired hosier named Gandy, who published them subsequently under the title

    Balzac

  • His substitute was called in to one of the hosier kings, bespoken by the wife of a wealthy tanner.

    The Way Home

  • [A West-end hosier advertises suits of Pyjamas in his window as "the latest styles in slumber-wear."]

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 102, May 21, 1892

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