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Etymologies

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Examples

  • The inua of the children would become confused, and the Real People would lose their good dreams.

    The Little Professor:

  • The hunter must win them over, not just through his guile and stealth and skill but also through the quality of the hunter's own courage and inua.

    The Terror

  • The moon's inua, Aningat, had incest with and otherwise abused his sister, Siqniq, the inua of the sun.

    The Terror

  • But they now carried the dark inua of the death-ship in them.

    The Terror

  • The seasons appeared then, and then life and death itself; shortly after the seasons arrived, a new era began in which the life spirit of human beings would die with the bodies and the inua-spirit would travel elsewhere.

    The Terror

  • The Tuunbaq soon learned that it enjoyed eating men more than eating nanuq, the bears, enjoyed eating man-souls more than it enjoyed eating walrus-souls, and enjoyed eating men more even than it enjoyed devouring the large, gentle, and intelligent inua-souls of the orca.

    The Terror

  • Just as human beings once tamed their cousin-spirits, the wolves, to become dogs who shared their masters 'inua, so did the angakkuit with the hearing-thoughts or sending-thoughts gifts learn how to tame and domesticate and control the smaller spirits who appeared to them.

    The Terror

  • The more complicated the inua-soul of a living thing is, the more delicious it is to a soul-predator.

    The Terror

  • This also explains why dogs are allowed to have names and a name-soul and even share their master's inua.

    The Terror

  • The inua — the permanent spirit-soul — travels, with all of its memories and skills intact, only hidden, to a boy or girl in the line of the dead person's family.

    The Terror

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  • Among the Inuit people of Alaska and Canada, inua refers to the spirit that resides in all people, animals, lakes, mountains, plants, and other natural phenomena. Similar to the concept of numen.

    November 4, 2007