Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Characteristic of, or like, one bred in a low and vulgar condition of life; mean; dishonorable; contemptible.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Leading a low or mean life; vulgar.
  • Pertaining to or characteristic of low or vulgar life; mean; shabby: as, low-lived manners; a low-lived trick.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Adams's hacks called Jefferson "a mean-spirited, low-lived ... son of a half-breed Indian squaw sired by a Virginia mulatto father."

    Clancy Sigal: Wimps Don't Win

  • Jefferson, in turn was described as “a mean-spirited, low-lived fellow, the son of a half-breed Indian squaw, sired by a Virginia mulatto father.”

    “Coarsening.” - Moe_Lane’s blog - RedState

  • "Jefferson is a mean-spirited, low-lived fellow, the son of a half-breed Indian squaw, sired by a Virginia Mulatto father"

    14 Important Science Questions

  • Adams's hacks called Jefferson "a mean-spirited, low-lived... son of a half-breed Indian squaw sired by a Virginia mulatto father."

    Clancy Sigal: Wimps Don't Win

  • There was in Paris at that epoch, in a low-lived old lodging in the Rue

    Les Miserables

  • Dick Middlemas had been urged forward, in his suit to Menie Gray, by his observing how much her partner, a booby laird, had been captivated by her; and she was now lowered in his esteem, because an impudent low-lived coxcomb had presumed to talk of her with disparagement.

    The Surgeon's Daughter

  • "He is a mean-spirited, low-lived fellow, the son of a half-breed Indian squaw, sired by a Virginia mulatto father." -- said by supporters of John Adams, of Thomas Jefferson, during the 1800 election.

    "Please stop it. Stop talking."

  • Jefferson was called "a mean-spirited, low-lived fellow, the son of a half-breed Indian squaw, sired by a Virginia mulatto father."

    Founders Chic

  • We are underbred and low-lived and illiterate; and in this respect I confess I do not make any very broad distinction between the illiterateness of my townsman who cannot read at all and the illiterateness of him who has learned to read only what is for children and feeble intellects.

    Walden

  • She further remarked that the wife was indeed rather low-lived; but that the husband was one of the best-behaved, politest, and civilest men in the world.

    Travels in England in 1782

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