Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. lubberly

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Lubberly.
  • n. A lubber.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as lubber.
  • Lubberly.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I read the blurb for our favourite and lubbard quilt.

    warning - very picture heavy!

  • I came this way with the falcon on purpose to find you, and yon half-bred lubbard told me which way you took flight.

    The Abbot

  • Commissary has known him as an indigent, good-for-nothing lubbard who has begged his way in the streets of Paris ever since he was released from gaol some months ago, after he had served a term for larceny.

    The League of the Scarlet Pimpernel

  • Goliath and of another lubbard, who had more fingers in his hand, and more inches to his stature, than ought to belong to an honest man, and who was slain by a nephew of good King David; and of many others whom I do not remember; nevertheless, they were all Philistines of gigantic stature.

    Myths and Marvels of Astronomy

  • I need only instance out of Holy Writ, the celebrated downfall of Goliah, and of another lubbard, who had more fingers to his hand, and more inches to his stature, than ought to belong to an honest man, and who was slain by a nephew of good King David; and of many others whom I do not remember; nevertheless they were all Philistines of gigantic stature.

    Peveril of the Peak

  • I need only instance out of Holy Writ, the celebrated downfall of Goliah, and of another lubbard, who had more fingers to his hand, and more inches to his stature, than ought to belong to an honest man, and who was slain by a nephew of good King

    Peveril of the Peak

  • In the first category were babelard or babillard for ` babbler '; lubbard for ` big, stupid lout' (from which came landlubber); caynard ` lazy dog '(ultimately from the Italian cagna ` bitch'); losard ` rake 'or ` profligate' (from Old English losel ` one who is lost to perdition '); and the mellifluous but contumelious musard, whose sin was day-dreaming.

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol XIX No 4

  • It was now the part of the huge porter to step forward; but the lubbard was so overwhelmed with confusion of spirit -- the contents of one immense black jack of double ale, which he had just drunk to quicken his memory, having treacherously confused the brain it was intended to clear -- that he only groaned piteously, and remained sitting on his stone seat; and the Queen would have passed on without greeting, had not the gigantic warder's secret ally, Flibbertigibbet, who lay perdue behind him, thrust

    Kenilworth

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