Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A presiding officer or chairperson, especially of the lower house of a convocation in the Anglican Church.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A spokesman (person who speaks on behalf of others)
  • n. A chairman of the lower house of a convocation in the Anglican Church

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who speaks for another.
  • n. The presiding officer of a convocation.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who speaks for another or for others.
  • n. The speaker or chairman of the lower house of the Convocation. (See convocation, 3.) He is elected by the lower house, subject to the approval of the metropolitan.

Etymologies

Medieval Latin prōlocūtor, from prōlocūtus, past participle of prōloquī, to speak forth : prō-, forward; see pro-1 + loquī, to speak; see tolkw- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Timothy, as we read, I Timothy, 4. 14, but this is to be understood as that some did it by the appointment of the presbytery, and most likely their proestos, or prolocutor, which it may be was St. Paul himself.

    Leviathan

  • But besides the judgement, there is necessary also the pronouncing of sentence: and this belonged always to the Apostle, or some pastor of the Church, as prolocutor; and of this our Saviour speaketh in the eighteenth verse, "Whatsoever ye shall bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatsoever ye shall loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven."

    Leviathan

  • The name of prophet signifieth in Scripture sometimes prolocutor; that is, he that speaketh from God to man, or from man to God: and sometimes predictor, or a foreteller of things to come: and sometimes one that speaketh incoherently, as men that are distracted.

    Leviathan

  • The fiction which is interdependency has a prolocutor in the congregation of Moloch….

    Think Progress » Coulter on Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA):

  • The fiction which is interdependency has a prolocutor in the congregation of Moloch.

    Think Progress » ThinkFast: August 10, 2006

  • Olivia undertook to be our prolocutor, and delivered the whole in a summary way, only saying, ‘We were thrown from our horses.’

    The Vicar of Wakefield

  • Second Epistle of John the round Head to James the prolocutor of the Rump parliment.

    Letter from Abigail Adams to John Adams, 22 October 1775

  • SPEA'KER, _s. _ one that speaks; the prolocutor of the Commons

    The Illustrated London Reading Book

  • These choose some wise, eloquent, and learned man to be their prolocutor or speaker (as they terme him) who propoundeth those things vnto them that are to be talked of, and asketh euerie mans opinion concerning the conclusion thereof.

    Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland (2 of 6): England (3 of 12) Henrie I.

  • Now when they haue said their minds, and yeelded their confirmation therevnto, the finall ratification is referred to the prince; so that if he thinke good that it shall passe for a law, he confirmeth also by the mouth of the lord Chancelor of the realme, who is prolocutor to the lords alwaies by the custome of that house.

    Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland (2 of 6): England (3 of 12) Henrie I.

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  • prolocutor – one who speaks for others; specifically a presiding officer or chairperson, especially of the lower house of a convocation in the Anglican Church

    July 14, 2008