Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A skilled rider of little-trained horses, especially one who breaks horses for riding.
  • n. A member of the First U.S. Volunteer Cavalry regiment under Theodore Roosevelt in the Spanish-American War.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A horsebreaker.
  • n. A noncommissioned officer in the British cavalry whose duty is to assist the riding master.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who breaks horses; especially (Mil.), a noncommissioned officer in the British cavalry, whose duty is to assist the riding master.
  • n. An officer or enlisted man in the 1st U. S. Volunteer Cavalry, a regiment raised for the Spanish war of 1898, composed mostly of Western cowboys and hunters and Eastern college athletes and sportsmen, largely organized, and later commanded, by Theodore Roosevelt. Sometimes, locally, a member of any of various volunteer cavalry commands raised in 1898.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who breaks young or wild horses to the saddle; in the army, a non-commissioned cavalry or artillery officer detailed to assist the riding-master, one being allowed to each troop or battery.
  • n. Loosely, a horseman occupied with hard, rough work.
  • n. One who breaks young or wild horses to the saddle; in the British army, a non-commissioned cavalry or artillery officer detailed to assist the riding-master, one being allowed to each troop or battery.
  • n. A horseman accustomed to rough or hard riding, such as cow-boys or frontiersmen: applied specifically, in the late Spanish-American war, to the members of a volunteer regiment of cavalry, recruited partly from Western cow-boys.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a member of the volunteer cavalry regiment led by Theodore Roosevelt in the Spanish-American War (1898)
  • n. a horseman skilled at breaking wild horses to the saddle

Etymologies

rough +‎ rider (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "I've found him at last," said a friend, a Texas civilian and ex-roughrider.

    With Funston's Men

  • Once active members of real Society; no woman could go back to "society," any more than a roughrider could return to a hobbyhorse.

    The Man-Made World; or, Our Androcentric Culture

  • The Joven, having met with no serious accidents during the two years he had officiated as roughrider, had kept his nerve, and was still young enough to enjoy his hazardous duties most thoroughly.

    Here, There and Everywhere

  • "The 'Daylight' is quite big enough to carry them all, for such a short distance, if they're properly stowed," said Jack Clark, the roughrider, who was a zealous advocate for the conveyance of his pet quadrupeds.

    Australian Search Party

  • Go to the Big Island of Hawaii to hang out with paniolos on a horseback ride through the open country, a cattle drive, or a long roughrider getaway weekend.

    SFGate: Top News Stories

  • Working from the information contained within the documents themselves, roughrider arrived at the following conclusions.

    WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

  • (If "Pittsburgh" has one redeeming aspect, it's undoubtedly Sarsgaard, who delivers a stunning performance as a teary-eyed roughrider right on cue.)

    The Guardian RSS

  • a roughrider hat Burton glimpsed her face as she looked off across the fields that marked the beginning of the course.

    Frank of Freedom Hill

  • 06/13/2001 16: 05: 32 PDT by roughrider The following investigation was conducted at 11: 00 AM this morning.

    WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

  • In particular I like the many horsemen -- Anthony Wayne dominating the landscape at Valley Forge; and George Washington again and again, and not least in Fairmount Park in Philadelphia (where there is also a bronze roughrider realistically set on a cliff -- as though from Ambrose

    Roving East and Roving West

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