Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A large bronze or (rarely) small silver coin minted during the Roman Republic and Empire, valued at two and a half asses.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A silver coin of the Roman republic, first issued in 269 b. c. It was the quarter of the denarius. See denarius. In the quotation there is a confusion of sestertius and sestertium.
  • n. The largest coin of copperalloy of the Roman empire.

Etymologies

From Latin sēstertius ("that is two-and-a-half"), from sēmis ("half") + tertius ("third"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The word sestertius signifies two asses and a half.

    An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

  • They also became the first living women to be pictured and explicitly identified on a coin of the imperial mint, a bronze sestertius produced in 37–38 showing three tiny full-length images of the sisters, each captioned by name but depicted with the accoutrements of three female deities personifying abstract qualities crucial to Roman success: Securitas (Security), Concordia (Harmony), and Fortuna (Fortune).10

    Caesars’ Wives

  • That Didius Julianus would pay in Greek currency, not Roman, indicates to me that the smart money had already dumped the as, the asses, and the sestertius for drachmas.

    America begins slide into third world status

  • A sestertius, another bronze coin, was worth four asses.

    America begins slide into third world status

  • Lupus flipped him a second silver sestertius and headed that way.

    Wagers of Sin

  • I could give you every bribable senator's price down to the last sestertius.

    Fortune's Favorites

  • When Sulla acceded to his request, Catilina became rich without needing to spend a single sestertius at the auctions.

    Fortune's Favorites

  • No point in offering her for sale, she wouldn't fetch a single sestertius.

    Fortune's Favorites

  • Batiatus had no money on the premises, not one single sestertius.

    Fortune's Favorites

  • Sulla paid in full with a promissory note for twenty silver talents at his bank, the price of a funeral Rome would talk about for days, and did not count the cost, he who normally squeezed every sestertius so carefully, so ungenerously.

    The Grass Crown

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Comments

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  • *Lines up a row of insect larvae. Their crime? Being tainted with tasty.*

    October 14, 2011

  • It's Friday, shouldn't you be executing criminals or something?

    October 14, 2011

  • Bandicoots? Never heard of 'em.

    October 14, 2011

  • Are you implying that bandicoots in your land aren't feted to plumpage with delectable veg*n tainted insect larvae? Witchettofu grubs are to die for.

    *worried*

    October 14, 2011

  • Agreed (though I still had something up my sleeve about an aunt and a plume).

    October 13, 2011

  • Mais oui, je t'en prie (provided we have this exact conversation again, as I’ve now spent all my French).

    (Tutoyer gives me an idea for a list.)

    October 13, 2011

  • leaden: On peut se tutoyer, non?
    bilby: I thought you were veg*n.

    October 13, 2011

  • Ruzuzu: Je vous en prie.

    Whispering (Is he OK? Should we call someone?)

    October 13, 2011

  • How can one have too many tainted insect larvae?
    *puzzled*

    October 13, 2011

  • This is the dawning!

    October 13, 2011

  • Leaden: Thanks!
    Bilby: I'm surprised you'd like a musical called Hare.

    October 12, 2011

  • When the asses are in the Seventh House
    And bronze aligns with orichalc
    Then peace will guide the planets
    But stuff that, let's hear moneytalk

    October 12, 2011

  • I think bilby has eaten too much fermented fruit and too many tainted insect larvae.

    October 12, 2011

  • Let the money shine, Let the money shine in
    The money shine in
    Let the money shine, Let the money shine in
    The money shine in
    Let the money shine, Let the money shine in
    The money shine in
    Let the money shine, Let the money shine in
    The money shine in
    Let the money shine, Let the money shine in
    The money shine in
    Let the money shine, Let the money shine in
    The money shine in
    Let the money shine, Let the money shine in
    The money shine in
    Let the money shine, Let the money shine in
    The money shine in
    Let the money shine, Let the money shine in
    The money shine in

    October 12, 2011

  • An HTML tag anywhere between the brackets disarms them. I usually use a set of span tags, e.g., “stage direction” renders as “stage direction”. (The placement of the tags doesn’t matter; “stage direction” works just as well.) Below I used

            fiddles with a
            <a href="/lists/the-universal-calculator">calculator</a>


    (Originally I also had span tags in there, but since you got me thinking about it, I realized I don’t need them in addition to the anchor.)

    If you nest brackets, only the innermost are magic; if I had wanted merely a mundane, commonplace, humdrum (dare I say quotidian?) arithmetic-only calculator, I could have just typed

            fiddles with a [calculator]

    to get

            fiddles with a [calculator]

    October 12, 2011

  • The least you could do is slap some brackets around "Diocletian razoo."

    And speaking of brackets . . . Leaden, how do you make your brackets all non-linky like that?

    October 11, 2011

  • What did you just call me?

    October 9, 2011

  • Sounds expensive. If you can't afford a whole ass, perhaps with a handful of bilbies you might get a decent piece of ass.

    October 9, 2011

  • So that works out to fiddles with a calculator . . . forty bilbies per ass.

    October 9, 2011

  • What kind of a two-and-half-assed comment is that?

    I couldn't give a Diocletian razoo for your amphibipygian cheekiness!

    October 9, 2011

  • Valued at two and a half asses... or 100 bilbies.

    A large bronze or (rarely) small silver coin minted during the Roman Republic and Empire, valued at two and a half asses.

    October 9, 2011