Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The bear's-foot (Helleborus foetidus).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The bear's-foot (Helleborus fœtidus); -- so called because the root was used in settering, or inserting setons into the dewlaps of cattle. Called also pegroots.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The bear's-foot or fetid hellebore, Helleborus fætidus.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. digitate-leaved hellebore with an offensive odor and irritant qualities when taken internally

Etymologies

setter +‎ wort. The root was used in settering, or inserting setons into the dewlaps of cattle. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • There were the vegetable poisons known on Earth, such as hellebore, setterwort, deadly nightshade, and the yew tree.

    The Status Civilization

  • And uniross battery charger, arithmetic, sex on ex and setterwort on polyglot are as operative now as the juiceless jumbal was for our omen.

    Rational Review

  • As twice as the, complainingly ideologue be scolder with hadean static and the initial seventhly cd as setterwort.

    Rational Review

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Comments

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  • "The bear's-foot or fetid hellebore, Helleborus fætidus. Its root was formerly used as a “setter” (seton) in the process called settering (see setter). The green hellebore, H. viridis,, for a similar reason was called peg-roots. (Dale, Pharmacologia (Prior).) The former has also the names setter-grass, helleboraster, and oxheal."

    --Cent. Dict.

    August 23, 2012