Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Obsolete form of scythe.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A scythe.
  • intransitive v. To sigh.
  • transitive v. To cut with a scythe; to scythe.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To journey; travel.
  • To sigh.
  • n. The older and proper spelling of scythe.
  • n. Way; path; course; figuratively, course of action; conduct.
  • n. Way; manner; mode.
  • n. Time; season; occasion.
  • n. A sigh.
  • n. An amended (restored) spelling of scythe.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Vt. July 15, 1846, while repairing to Grind a sithe on a stone atach'd to the

    Tombstones Tell a Story

  • Yiyo loo nto iinduli zeNqadu sithe cwaka, yasweleka ingoma yemilonji yehlathi.

    Speech at the Funeral of King Xolilizwe Sigcawu

  • And sithe that foules, that han no kyndely wytt ne resoun, gon thidre to seche that gloriouse virgyne; wel more oughten men than to seche hire and to worschipen hire.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • But it is fulle long, sithe that ony man durste neyhe to the tour; for it is alle deserte and fulle of dragouns and grete serpentes, and fulle of dyverse venymouse bestes alle abouten.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And upward to the see, upon the watre, was wont to be the grete cytee of Troye, in a fulle fayr playn: but that cytee was destroyed by hem of Grece, and lytylle apperethe there of, be cause it so longe sithe it was destroyed.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • Calyffeez, ne noughte han ben, sithe the tyme of Sowdan Sahaladyn.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • In that hille and in that same place, at the day of doom, 4 aungeles, with 4 trompes, schulle blowen and reysen alle men, that hadden suffred dethe, sithe that the world was formed, from dethe to lyve; and schnlle comen in body and soule in juggement; before the face of oure Lord, in the Vale of

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • Now sithe I have devysed zou the londes and the kyngdoms toward the parties septentrionales, in comynge down from the lond of Cathay, unto the londes of the Cristene, towardes Pruysse and Rossye; now schalle I devyse zou of other londes and kyngdomes, comynge doun be other costes, toward the right syde, unto the see of Grece, toward the lond of Cristene men: and therfore that, aftre Ynde and aftre

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And thei seye, that it hathe ben there sithe the beginnynge of the world; and was sumtyme grene, and bare leves, unto the tyme that oure Lord dyede on the cros; and thanne it dryede; and so dyden alle trees, that weren thanne in the

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And sithe that Cristene men han suche beleeve, that ben enformed and taughte alle day, be holy doctryne, where inne thei schold beleeve, it is no marvaylle thanne, that the

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

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