Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An implement consisting of a long, curved single-edged blade with a long bent handle, used for mowing or reaping.
  • transitive v. To cut with or as if with a scythe.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An instrument for mowing grass, grain, or the like, by hand, composed of a long, curving blade, with the concave edge sharped, made fast to a long handle, called a snath, which is bent into a form convenient for use.
  • n. A scythe-shaped blade attached to ancient war chariots.
  • v. To cut with a scythe; to cut off as with a scythe; to mow.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An instrument for mowing grass, grain, or the like, by hand, composed of a long, curving blade, with a sharp edge, made fast to a long handle, called a snath, which is bent into a form convenient for use.
  • n. A scythe-shaped blade attached to ancient war chariots.
  • transitive v. To cut with a scythe; to cut off as with a scythe; to mow.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To mow; cut with a scythe, or as with a scythe.
  • To arm or furnish with a scythe or scythes.
  • To make a curving movement like that of a scythe, in mowing.
  • n. An instrument used in mowing or reaping, consisting of a long curving blade with a sharp edge, made fast at an angle to a handle or snath, which is bent into a convenient form for swinging the blade to advantage.
  • n. A curved sharp blade anciently attached to the wheels of some war-chariots.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. cut with a scythe
  • n. an edge tool for cutting grass; has a long handle that must be held with both hands and a curved blade that moves parallel to the ground

Etymologies

Middle English sithe, from Old English sīthe, sickle.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English sythe or sithe, from Old English sīðe ("sickle"). The silent c appeared in the early 15th century because it was wrongly thought that the word was linked to Latin scissor ("carver, cutter") and scindere ("to cut"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • "She handed him a shovel, rake, scythe, and a pair of gloves..." The Shack by WM Paul

    October 1, 2010