standing-ground love

standing-ground

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Place or ground on which to stand; especially, that on which one rests, in a figurative sense; a basis of operations or of argument; a fundamental principle.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He had, however, as he was aware, thrown a great deal of expression into his inquiries after her health, and he had, now to calculate how he could best use the standing-ground that he had made for himself.

    The Claverings

  • She looked at him as she slowly receded to her former standing-ground, but he never for a moment suspected the nature of her purpose.

    Lady Anna

  • Defeated in the attempt to act like a strong man, he could not yet recover standing-ground, knew not how to tone his utterances.

    New Grub Street

  • Surely not; it was the rock: _that_ was his standing-ground.

    Frank Oldfield Lost and Found

  • Filled with frenzy at this idea, he rushed out upon deck, where the general apparent confusion confirmed his fears; then he sprung upon the bulwarks, gazed around him in utter dismay at the crew in busy motion about him, tottered on his insecure standing-ground, caught at a rope to save himself; missed it, and then, with a terrible shriek of horror and despair, fell headlong overboard into the boiling waters.

    Frank Oldfield Lost and Found

  • Just so with the pledge; it is not the Christian abstainer's standing-ground.

    Frank Oldfield Lost and Found

  • There is, then, no standing-ground left for a narrowly individualistic

    Christianity and Progress

  • The cattle which remain in the village are taken by the owners in the early morning to the _khirkha_ or central standing-ground.

    The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India Volume II

  • There is no longer any standing-ground beneath his feet and he could not be driven into a deeper despair if God himself had yielded to temptation.

    The Redemption of David Corson

  • Here was his brother living amongst them, and yet, having taken the vows of some self-imposed duty upon him, he was looking down upon them all as though from some higher standing-ground.

    Amos Huntingdon

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.