Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Above a condyle.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Situated above a condyle or condyles.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Situated above the condyles, as of the femur, humerus, occipital bone, or lower jaw-bone.
  • A well-marked and constant foramen in the inner condyloid ridge of the humerus of many mammals, through which pass the brachial artery and median nerve. It is occasionally found as an anomaly in man, or indicated by the supracondylar process (which see, under process). Also supracondyloid and supratrochlear foramen.

Etymologies

supra- +‎ condylar (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In my case the treatment for a supracondylar humerus fracture involved immobilizing my arm in a cast that locked my elbow at a roughly sixty-degree angle.

    The Best Revenge

  • —The short head may be absent; additional heads may arise from the ischial tuberosity, the linea aspera, the medial supracondylar ridge of the femur or from various other parts.

    IV. Myology. 8b. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Thigh

  • The Vastus medialis (Vastus internus) arises from the lower half of the intertrochanteric line, the medial lip of the linea aspera, the upper part of the medial supracondylar line, the tendons of the Adductor longus and the Adductor magnus and the medial intermuscular septum.

    IV. Myology. 8b. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Thigh

  • The medial intermuscular septum, thicker than the preceding, extends from the lower part of the crest of the lesser tubercle of the humerus below the Teres major, along the medial supracondylar ridge to the medial epicondyle; it is blended with the tendon of the Coracobrachialis, and affords attachment to the Triceps brachii behind and the Brachialis in front.

    IV. Myology. 7d. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Arm

  • The lateral intermuscular septum extends from the lower part of the crest of the greater tubercle, along the lateral supracondylar ridge, to the lateral epicondyle; it is blended with the tendon of the Deltoideus, gives attachment to the Triceps brachii behind, to the Brachialis, Brachioradialis, and Extensor carpi radialis longus in front, and is perforated by the radial nerve and profunda branch of the branchial artery.

    IV. Myology. 7d. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Arm

  • On either side it gives off a strong intermuscular septum, which is attached to the corresponding supracondylar ridge and epicondyle of the humerus.

    IV. Myology. 7d. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Arm

  • The inferior third of this border is raised into a slight ridge, the medial supracondylar ridge, which becomes very prominent below; it presents an anterior lip for the origins of the Brachialis and Pronator teres, a posterior lip for the medial head of the Triceps brachii, and an intermediate ridge for the attachment of the medial intermuscular septum.

    II. Osteology. 6a. 3. The Humerus

  • A small, hook-shaped process of bone, the supracondylar process, varying from 2 to 20 mm. in length, is not infrequently found projecting from the antero-medial surface of the body of the humerus 5 cm. above the medial epicondyle.

    II. Osteology. 6a. 3. The Humerus

  • The epicondyles are continuous above with the supracondylar ridges.

    II. Osteology. 6a. 3. The Humerus

  • Its lower part forms a prominent, rough margin, a little curved from behind forward, the lateral supracondylar ridge, which presents an anterior lip for the origin of the Brachioradialis above, and Extensor carpi radialis longus below, a posterior lip for the Triceps brachii, and an intermediate ridge for the attachment of the lateral intermuscular septum.

    II. Osteology. 6a. 3. The Humerus

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