Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The deeply forked tail of a swallow.
  • n. Something similar to the tail of a swallow.
  • n. See tailcoat.
  • n. Any of various colorful, widely distributed butterflies of the family Papilionidae, usually having an extension at the end of each hind wing that resembles the tails of certain swallows.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the forked tail of a swallow.
  • n. anything, such as a burgee, of a similar forked shape.
  • n. a type of tailcoat with two long tapering tails.
  • n. any of various butterflies of the family Papilionidae, having a forked extension to the hind wing.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A kind of tenon or tongue used in making joints. See dovetail.
  • n. A species of willow.
  • n. An outwork with converging sides, its head or front forming a reëntrant angle; -- so called from its form. Called also priestcap.
  • n. A swallow-tailed coat.
  • n. An arrow.
  • n. Any one of numerous species of large and handsome butterflies, belonging to Papilio and allied genera, in which the posterior border of each hind wing is prolongated in the form of a long lobe.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A swallow's tail; hence, a long and deeply forked or forficate tail, like that of the barn-swallow.
  • n. A swallow-tailed animal.
  • n. Something resembling in form or suggesting the forked tail of a swallow.
  • n. In joinery, same as dovetail.
  • n. In fortification, same as bonnet à prêtre (which see, under bonnet).
  • n. A Swallow-tailed coat; a dress-coat.
  • n. The points of a burgee.
  • n. A broad or barbed arrow-head.
  • Same as swallow-tailed.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a man's full-dress jacket with two long tapering tails at the back

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It was of a style popularly known as a swallowtail, faced with satin as to lapels and once gracefully rounded to a long, bisected skirt in the rear.

    Then I'll Come Back to You

  • Informal evening dress differs from formal in the wearing of the Tuxedo or dinner coat in place of the "swallowtail," and the substitution of a black silk for a white lawn tie.

    The Complete Bachelor Manners for Men

  • He was punctiliously dressed in the mode: a "swallowtail," bright, soft silk tie of ample proportions, frilled linen, and sparkling studs.

    The Gray Dawn

  • His doublet was prolonged behind into something resembling a violent exaggeration of what is now termed a "swallowtail," but was much obscured by the swelling folds of an enormous black, glossy-looking cloak, which must have been very much too long in calm weather, as the wind, whistling round the old house, carried it clear out from the wearer's shoulders to about four times his own length.

    The King of the Golden River

  • a violent exaggeration of what is now termed a "swallowtail," but was much obscured by the swelling folds of an enormous black, glossy-looking cloak, which must have been very much too long in calm weather, as the wind, whistling round the old house, carried it clear out from the wearer's shoulders to about four times his own length.

    Types of Children's Literature

  • "swallowtail" coat with brass buttons made its appearance, and with shoes newly polished he was ready for church.

    Brook Farm

  • Norfolk sites such as Hickling Broad will see probably our most photogenic butterfly – the swallowtail – begin to emerge at the end of the month.

    Are butterflies the UK's most beautiful endangered species? | Dan Flenley

  • My closest encounter came at Strumpshaw Fen RSPB reserve, where I had gone in search of swallowtail butterflies and Norfolk hawker dragonflies.

    Birdwatch: Pheasant

  • Albert was taken by a third of this species—really an upright mantid of sorts, its carapace like a gleaming veined topcoat in swallowtail.

    Locust Valley Breakdown

  • But now he could freely mingle with the other thirteen hundred students who darted about the campus in their Edwardian-era Mr. Chips uniform of pinstripe trousers worn with a swallowtail coat.

    William and Kate

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