Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A sequence of linguistic units in a syntagmatic relationship to one another.
  • n. A sequence of words in a particular syntactic relationship to one another; a construction.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A Macedonian phalanx fighting formation consisting of 256 men with long spears (sarissae).

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In botany, a general term applied by Pfeffer to all bodies made up of tagmata, or theoretical aggregates of chemical molecules. See tagma.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a syntactic string of words that forms a part of some larger syntactic unit

Etymologies

New Latin, from French syntagme, from Greek suntagma, suntagmat-, arrangement, syntactic unit, from suntassein, suntag-, to put in order; see syntax.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Late Latin syntagma, from Ancient Greek σύνταγμα (suntagma, "syntactical element"), from συντάσσω (suntassō, "arrange together”, “to order"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Cagle also notes that The Film Experience is advanced and likely difficult, but I didn't find this to be particularly true for the second edition, though certain advanced terms are included syntagma is still there, as it should be!

    Introduction to Film Textbooks

  • Despite the ultra-essentialist interpretation of Henry's metaphysics that began with Suárez, the syntagma esse essentiae does not designate a separate being, but only the fact that a res thus constituted has an objective content and so is objectively possible; that is, it can be placed in act by God.

    Hitler's Angel (A Meta Christmas Carol)

  • The end of the signifier/signified dialectic which facilitates the accumulation of knowledge and of meaning, the linear syntagma of cumulative discourse.

    Jean Baudrillard

  • As the firstfruits of his travels he published, for the Knights of Malta, "Specula Melitensis Encyclica sive syntagma novum instrumentorum physico-mathematicorum" (Messina, 1638).

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • Though he informs us in the preface that his object was to trace the outlines of the great “latifundium regni philosophici” in a single syntagma, yet he really does no more than arrange a number of separate treatises or manuals, and even dictionaries, within the limits of a couple of folios.

    Diderot and the Encyclopaedists

  • _ -- The writings of Justin (his syntagma against heresies has not been preserved), Irenæus, Tertullian, Hippolytus, Clement of

    History of Dogma, Volume 1 (of 7)

  • To all appearance it was he who began the great literary struggle for the expulsion of heterodoxy (see his [Greek: syntagma kata pasôn tôn gegenêmenôn haireseôn]); but, judging from those writings of his that have been preserved to us, it seems very unlikely that he was already successful in finding a fixed standard for determining orthodox

    History of Dogma, Volume 2 (of 7)

  • Though he informs us in the preface that his object was to trace the outlines of the great "latifundium regni philosophici" in a single syntagma, yet he really does no more than arrange a number of separate treatises or manuals, and even dictionaries, within the limits of a couple of folios.

    Diderot and the Encyclopædists (Vol 1 of 2)

  • MILTON to comprise, in one hundred and thirty beautiful lines, the two large and learned syntagma which Selden had composed on that abstract subject.

    Literary Character of Men of Genius Drawn from Their Own Feelings and Confessions

  • The rhizome, I understand as a different syntagma where the possible horizontal connections are so vast that you will never end constructing a series.

    Masters of Media, New Media MA Amsterdam

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