Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Old spellings of true, truly.
  • An obsolete form of trow.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Chaucer, in a well-known verse, expresses his wish that Adam the scrivener shall copy Bo√ęthius and Troilus "trewe" and not write it "newe."

    Old English Libraries; The Making, Collection and Use of Books During the Middle Ages

  • 4.30 In copying, however, especially when it is mechanically done, it is almost as difficult to write "trewe" as it is to write "newe": the imp of the perverse makes his home at the elbow of the scribe, ever ready to profit by drowsiness or trifling inattention.

    Old English Libraries; The Making, Collection and Use of Books During the Middle Ages

  • Yt ys knowlechable seekres of lore like thynselfe who maken the trewe discoveries yn clios arte.

    Crackpot Medieval "Facts"

  • Make what use yowe pleas of thiss informasion: and belieue me to haue no other motife, than to serue yowe, becavs of yowre vartues, whiche make yowe deserue a better retorne, I am, thof I shall not set my trewe name, yowre grete admirer and seruant,

    Pamela

  • And they seyn also, that Jesu Crist spak als sone as he was born; and that he was an holy prophete and a trewe, in woord and dede, and meke and pytous and rightefulle and with outen ony vyce.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And therfore seye I of this folk, that ben so trewe and so feythefulle, that God lovethe hem.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And bezonde that yle, is another yle, gret and gode, and, plentyfous, where that ben gode folk and trewe, and of gode lyvynge, aftre hire beleve, and of gode feythe.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • Be the whiche, my boke was preeved for trewe; in so moche that thei schewed me a boke, that my boke was examynde by, that comprehended fulle moche more, ben an hundred part; be the whiche, the Mappa

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And in generalle, alle the men of tho yles and of alle the marches there abouten, ben more trewe than in ony othere contrees there abouten, and more righte fulle than othere, in alle thinges.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And alle be it that theyse folk han not the articles of oure feythe, as wee han, natheles for hire gode feythe naturelle, and for hire gode entent, I trowe fulle, that God lovethe hem, and that God take hire servyse to gree, right as he did of Job, that was a Paynem, and held him for his trewe servaunt.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

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