Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state or character of being uniform; uniformity.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the quality of lacking diversity or variation (even to the point of boredom)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Though perhaps, when they came to the use of speech, some regarding the uniformness of what was perceived, might call it the SAME thing: others, especially regarding the diversity of persons who perceived, might choose the denomination of DIFFERENT things.

    Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous

  • Sect. 62, which rules grounded on the analogy, and uniformness observed in the production of natural effects, are most agreeable, and sought after by the mind; for that they extend our prospect beyond what is present, and near to us, and enable us to make very probable conjectures, touching things that may have happened at very great distances of time and place, as well as to predict things to come ¦.

    George Berkeley

  • Q Jake, have you heard anything from the President saying that in light of all of these problems from this election, there needs to be some kind of change, maybe bringing some type of universal uniformness within the election system here in this country?

    Press Briefing By Jake Siewert

  • Though perhaps, when they came to the use of speech, some regarding the uniformness of what was perceived, might call it the same thing: others, especially regarding the diversity of persons who perceived, might choose the denomination of different things.

    The Third Dialogue

  • Though perhaps, when they came to the use of speech, some regarding the uniformness of what was perceived, might call it the SAME thing: others, especially regarding the diversity of persons who perceived, might choose the denomination of

    Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous

  • In spite of the uniformness of the results obtained in many successive years, Darwin inferred that the plants must have been in an "unnatural state.")

    More Letters of Charles Darwin — Volume 2

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