Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To view or treat with contempt; despise.
  • transitive v. To speak ill of; disparage.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To despise
  • v. To express a disparaging opinion of; to slander or vilify.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To value lightly; to depreciate; to slight; to despise.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To express a disparaging or moan opinion of; slander; vilify; treat slightingly or contemptuously.
  • To express disparaging opinions of a person; uso vilification.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. belittle

Etymologies

Middle English vilipenden, from Old French vilipender, from Latin vīlipendere : vīlis, worthless; + pendere, to consider, weigh.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English vilipenden, from Old French vilipender, from Latin vilipendere, from vilis ("worthless") + pendere ("to consider, weigh"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The malison of her muliebrity allows niddering males opportunity for oppugnant vilipend.

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  • With mansuetude compossible with my muliebrity, I condemn those niddering, olid morons who, in caliginosity of understanding, vilipend our English by attempting to exuviate words for which they cannot see any present custom.

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  • ‘And yet, sir, I cannot but marvel that you, Colonel, whom I noted to have so much of the amor patritz when we met in Edinburgh as even to vilipend other countries, should have chosen to establish your Lares, or household gods, procul a patrice finibus, and in a manner to expatriate yourself.’

    Waverley

  • I believe to contain more food to maintain the fibre of the soul for right living and high thinking than all pagan literature together, though I would by no means vilipend the study of the classicks.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 09, No. 51, January, 1862

  • He would be a thin spirit who should gain a lady's friendly regard, and then vilipend because she knew no better, or could not choose.

    Earthwork out of Tuscany Being Impressions and Translations of Maurice Hewlett

  • The fact that to the eighteenth century belong the subjects of more than half of these thirty volumes, is a proof of the fascination of the period for an author who has never ceased to vilipend it.

    Critical Miscellanies, Vol. I Essay 2: Carlyle

  • Edinburgh, as even to vilipend other countries, should have chosen to establish your Lares, or household gods, _procul a patri finibus, _ and in a manner to expatriate yourself. ''

    The Waverley

  • This general admonition being addressed to the team at large, the zagal descended to details, and proceeded to vilipend the galloping beasts separately, beginning with the leader.

    Castilian Days

  • She will seize her opportunity to vilipend me, and I shall be condemned by the kind of court-martial which hurries over the forms of

    Complete Project Gutenberg Works of George Meredith

  • She will seize her opportunity to vilipend me, and

    The Tragic Comedians — Volume 3

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Comments

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  • 1. To treat someone with contempt.
    2. To disparage.

    December 3, 2007