Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A bulk quantity; usually of small items, particularly money.

Etymologies

Probably an alteration of wedge. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Heh, that's a good one, thanks, Chained_Bear. Surprisingly, it isn't in my 85,000-word bilingual dictionary. It looks like I'll have get out my bulky English-Russian dictionary for a precise translation.

    Wodge – ком, комок and ломоть, ку�?. Nice!

    July 31, 2008

  • You'll see, if you look at the mammoth-sized tags, that I have removed my madeupical tag. It has been completely unmadeupicalized.

    Wodge. A real word.

    October 12, 2007

  • AHA!! It isn't madeupical!! Here's what the OED says:

    Colloquial (originally dialect): A bulky mass; a chunk or lump; a wad (of paper).
    Usages:
    1922 Chambers's Jrnl. Dec. 797/1 A ‘wodge’ in his left breast-pocket. 1949 D. SMITH I capture Castle II. viii. 112 You must take only one kind of food on the fork at a time; never a nice comfortable wodge of meat and vegetables together.

    Earlier usages:
    1860 All Year Round 28 July 368/2 The unhappy children (Blue-coat boys)...are compelled...to turn their skirts up and gird them in a great hot wadge about their loins. 1862 C. A. COLLINS Cruise upon Wheels xxiv. (1863) 413 That monstrous wadge of a dressing-gown.

    October 12, 2007

  • Oh it is not madeupical!! It can't be! No! *puts fingers in ears* LA LA LA LA!!

    October 12, 2007

  • Yum. A delicious wodge is exactly what a squished-up PB&J sandwich should taste like!

    Of course, it can't be wet bread.

    October 11, 2007

  • Usage note:
    "I had one last sandwich remaining in my pocket, but had been reluctant to eat it on the coach, under the curious gaze of my fellow travelers. I pulled it out and carefully unwrapped it. Peanut butter and jelly on white bread, it was considerably the worse for wear, with the purple stains of the jelly seeping through the limp bread, and the whole thing mashed into a flattened wodge. It was delicious."
    Diana Gabaldon, _Voyager_, 1994.

    To this day, even if my PB&J is not flattened, I always think of it as a delicious wodge. It is simply the perfect word for a squished-up PB&J sandwich.

    October 11, 2007