Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • initialism programming, database Acronym of Create, Read, Update, and Delete.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In case you're not familiar with this archetypical example of devgeek humor, CRUD is shorthand for Create / Retrieve / Update / Delete, and it describes most of the basic operations you'll run into when developing a database-backed app.

    Cooking up a Shitstorm

  • Bill began with the basics of database functions, using the acronym CRUD, which stands for create, retrieve, update and delete.

    CMSWire.com - All News

  • Bill began with the basics of database functions, using the acronym CRUD, which stands for create, retrieve, update and delete.

    CMSWire.com - All News

  • * Records Manager - every dataset can have its records managed via so-called CRUD (create - read - update - delete) rights.

    PR.com Press Releases

  • For the sake of simplicity let's call it "CRUD" or even setter/getter oriented SOA, degenerating to "tons of getters and setters or CRUDs" and ignoring the dislocation.

    TheServerSide.com: News

  • Affectionately known as "CRUD" Who says computer scientists can make up cute acronyms?

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • Affectionately known as "CRUD" Who says computer scientists can make up cute acronyms?

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • Affectionately known as "CRUD" Who says computer scientists can make up cute acronyms?

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • Affectionately known as "CRUD" Who says computer scientists can make up cute acronyms?

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • Affectionately known as "CRUD" Who says computer scientists can make up cute acronyms?

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

Comments

New comments are temporarily disabled while we update our database.

  • Were you looking for crud?

    May 28, 2010

  • Why yes, I'm a crud-hunter by profession. By the time I was old enough to walk grandaddy was hauling me through temperate bogs in search of crud. In fact much of my idle youth was spend daydreaming of crud and in the creation of intricate crud-doodles on the cover of my textbook during Nomadic Herders of Mesopotamania class. I could hardly wait to leave school and pursue crud with all the vigour I could muster.

    May 28, 2010

  • "CRUD in Italian: CRUD"

    May 28, 2010

  • Not true, actually. If CRUD is an acronym then by Italian convention it would be written Crud. Only the first letter of acronyms is capitalised.

    May 28, 2010

  • Well, crud! That'll learn me to go around trustin' boxes what say "translate to...."

    May 28, 2010

  • I have no doubt that bilbybutt's crud-doodles were lovely in a cruddy way.

    May 28, 2010

  • I write Italian acronyms all caps. It's recent (newspaper*) policy to write them like this -> Dna or even dna

    but I personally find that awfully ugly.

    *I had an email exchange with an Italian language expert about that, a while ago. He replied

    io mi adeguo quando posso all'uso non solo giornalistico di usare solo la maiuscola per gli acronimi e le altre sigle che per la frequenza del loro impiego sono ormai assimilabili ai sostantivi. Le tutte maiuscole fanno un brutto effetto grafico: non sono meglio Consob, Psi, Ds, Telecom di CONSOB, PSI, DS, TELECOM?

    I replied

    No.

    May 29, 2010

  • I agree, pro. It's awfully ugly and unclear. If you want a word to be recognized as an acronym -- and not a misspelled, madeupical or foreign word - you must use either all caps or periods after each letter.... no??

    May 29, 2010

  • Note also that the current Australian Prime Minister, Mr Kevin Rudd, may be referred to (at least in campus newspapers) as Krudd.

    June 3, 2010

  • In computer programming, create, read, update and delete (CRUD) are the four basic functions of persistent storage. It is sometimes used to describe user interface conventions that facilitate viewing, searching, and changing information; often using computer-based forms and reports. The term was likely first popularized by James Martin in a 1983 book titled "Managing the Data-base Environment".

    July 30, 2011