Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The 11th month of the year in the Gregorian calendar.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The eleventh month of the year, containing 30 days. Abbreviated Nov.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The eleventh month of the year, containing thirty days.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun The eleventh month of the Gregorian calendar, following October and preceding December. Abbreviation: Nov or Nov.
  • proper noun The letter N in the ICAO spelling alphabet.
  • noun The letter N in the ICAO spelling alphabet.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the month following October and preceding December

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English Novembre, from Old French, from Latin November, ninth month, from novem, nine; see newn̥ in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Middle English, from Old French novembre, from Latin november ("ninth month"), from Latin novem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁néwn̥ (“nine”); + Latin -ber, from adjectival suffix -bris; November was the ninth month in the Roman calendar

Examples

Comments

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  • "Medieval Europe lacked most of the high-yielding grass and root crops that are today used to feed herds through the winter and enable a year-round supply of fresh meat--the turnip, for instance, was still considered a garden vegetable. ... Only the largest and wealthiest households had either the pasture to keep their herds alive or the storage space to put aside sufficient hay to see them through the winter.

    "For all those who lacked this luxury, as soon as the frosts moved in and the pasture died off, a good proportion of the herd had to be slaughtered. Traditionally, the seasonal killing was set for Martinmas, or November 11--for which reason the Anglo-Saxon name for November was 'Blood Month.' What could not be eaten within a few days had to be salted down..."

    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 109-110

    (More can be found on spices.)

    December 2, 2016